bounce

A special effect in which characters alternate in up/down positions. The baseline shift of alternating letters is adjusted.

Bounce

1) To bring in the House Curtain fast, then take it out again immediately. 2) Lighting term describing light beams reflected off the stage or set.

Bounce

[Hadouken! Song] The result of the discussion was no consensus. @harej 23:41, 27 September 2009 (UTC) ====User:Dennisgaudenzi==== Advertising. 3^0$0%0 1@!k (0#1®!%$ 18:27, 20 September 2009 (UTC) ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bounce_(Hadouken!_Song)

Bounce

[Hadouken! song] `Bounce` is a 2007 download only single by New Rave band Hadouken! It was released to promote their upcoming USB mixtape, Not Here To Please You. This version of `Bounce` is different from the one that appears on Not Here to Please You and the Love, Sweat and Beer EP. The song was their standard set opener throughout their ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bounce_(Hadouken!_song)

Bounce

Bounce is slang for resilience.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZBA.HTM

Bounce

To land at unsurvivable speed. Also to frap, or go in
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20082

Bounce

Flash or tungsten light bounced off a reflector (such as the ceiling, walls or brolly) to give the effect of natural light. (see Brollies)
Found on http://www.peterashbyhayter.co.uk/glossaryT-Z.html

bounce

[n] - rebounding from an impact (or series of impacts) 2. [n] - the quality of a substance that is able to rebound 3. [v] - come back after being refused 4. [v] - refuse to accept and send back 5. [v] - leap suddenly 6. [v] - move up and down repeatedly 7. [v] - spring back 8. [v] - eject from the premises 9. [v]
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=bounce

Bounce

an item of email is said to have bounced when it fails to find its recipient and is returned to the sender, sometimes with a message explaining why it was unable to be delivered
Found on http://www.archivemag.co.uk/

Bounce

When recording or sequencing, to bounce tracks means to combine (mix) several tracks together and record them on another track.
Found on http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/music%20tech%20glossary/Music%20Tech%20Gl

Bounce

1. A repeating registration problem at the printing stage.
Found on http://www.tso.co.uk/solutions/publishingsolutions/printproduction/printglo

Bounce

A term which is used to describe the oscillations of a rigid body, for example, the sprung and unsprung masses of a vehicle, that consists primarily of vertical displacement. See also: Frequency.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/b/o/bounce/source.html

Bounce

Bounce intransitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Bounced ; present participle & verbal noun Bouncing ] [ Middle English bunsen ; confer Dutch bonzen to strike, bounce, bons blow, LG. bunsen to knock; al...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/85

Bounce

Bounce transitive verb 1. To drive against anything suddenly and violently; to bump; to thump. Swift. 2. To cause to bound or rebound; sometimes, to toss. 3. To eject violently, as from a room; to discharge unceremoniously, as from employment. [ Collog. U. S.] 4.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/85

Bounce

Bounce noun 1. A sudden leap or bound; a rebound. 2. A heavy, sudden, and often noisy, blow or thump. « The bounce burst open the door. Dryden. » 3. An explosion, or the noise of one. [ Obsolete] 4. Bluster; brag; untruthful boasting; aud...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/85

Bounce

Bounce adverb With a sudden leap; suddenly. « This impudent puppy comes bounce in upon me. Bickerstaff. »
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/85

bounce

1. To strike or thump, so as to rebound, or to make a sudden noise; a knock loudly. 'Another bounces as hard as he can knock.' (Swift) 'Against his bosom bounced his heaving heart.' (Dryden) ... 2. To leap or spring suddenly or unceremoniously; to bound; as, she bounced into the room. 'Out bounced the mastiff.' (Swift) 'Bounced off his arm+chair.' ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

bounce

bouncing noun rebounding from an impact (or series of impacts)
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=bounce

bounce

bounciness noun the quality of a substance that is able to rebound
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=bounce

bounce

resile verb spring back; spring away from an impact; `The rubber ball bounced`; `These particles do not resile but they unite after they collide`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=bounce

bounce

verb eject from the premises; `The ex-boxer`s job is to bounce people who want to enter this private club`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=bounce

bounce

verb come back after being refused; `the check bounced`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=bounce

bounce

verb move up and down repeatedly
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=bounce

Bounce

A check returned by a bank because it is not payable, usually because of insufficient funds. Also used in the context of securities to refer to the rejection and ensuing reclamation of a security; a stock price`s abrupt decline and recovery.
Found on http://www.duke.edu/~charvey/Classes/wpg/bfglosb.htm

Bounce

• (n.) Bluster; brag; untruthful boasting; audacious exaggeration; an impudent lie; a bouncer. • (v. t.) To drive against anything suddenly and violently; to bump; to thump. • (v. t.) To bully; to scold. • (n.) A dogfish of Europe (Scyllium catulus). • (v. t.) To cause to bound or rebound; sometimes, to toss. • (n.) An...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/bounce/
No exact match found