Copy of `CommuniGate - Comms info`

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CommuniGate - Comms info
Category: Electronics and Engineering > Communications
Date & country: 30/12/2010, UK
Words: 101


ANTHER
The pollen bearing part of the stamen.

AXIL
The angle formed by the junction of the leaf and stem from which new shoots develop.

BERRY
The fleshy fruit containing the seeds; the ovary after fertilization.

BIENNIAL
The term used for the process of growing a plant one year to flower the following year.

BLEEDING
The loss of sap from a cut or damaged shoot of the plant.

BREAK
To branch or send out new growth from dormant wood.

BUD
Undeveloped shoot found in the axils of the plant; also the developing flower.

CALLUS
The scab formed during the healing process of a cut surface. It also forms at the end of a cutting before rooting commences.

CALYX
The sepals and tube together; the outer part of the flower.

CAMBIUM
A layer of activity; dividing cells around the xylem or wood.

cell.


CHLOROPHYLLS
Green colourants present in plant tissue that contain magnesium and are contained in chloroplasts. They trap blue and red light (energy) and are responsible for photosynthesis.

CHLOROPLASTS
Green plastids that contain chlorophyll. They are responsible for photosynthesis and are found in leaf cells and green stems.

CHROMOSOMES
Thread-like bodies consisting of a series of different genes arranged in linear fashion. They occur in the nucleus of every plant

CIRCADIAN RHYTHMS
Cyclical actions most often associated in fuchsia`s with daylight and darkness. Seasonal swings also perform this cycle.

CLEAR STEM
The amount of stem clear of growth. It is measured from the soil level to the first branch or leaf. It is of importance when growing standards or bushes that may be entered into shows.

COMPOST
A mixture of ingredients specially prepared for the growing of cuttings, plants, or the sowing of seeds.

CORDATE
Heart shaped.

COROLLA
The collective term for the petals; the inner part of the flower.

CULTIVAR
In cultivation; a cross; not a species.

CUTTING
A piece from a plant encouraged to form roots and thus produce a new plant. This is vegetative reproduction and plants produced by this method are true to their parental type.

DAMP DOWN
Raising the humidity of the atmosphere in the greenhouse by spraying plants, benches or paths with water.

DAMPING OFF
The collapse and possible death of cuttings, or seedlings, usually due to attack at ground level by soil-borne fungi. `Cheshunt Compound` can be used to combat this problem.

DOUBLE
A fuchsia which has eight or more petals in the corolla, but excludes petaloids.

ELLIPTIC
An oval shape, with pointed or rounded ends.

EMASCULATION
The process of removing immature stamens from a host plant to prevent self-pollination, during the cross pollination of two plants.

FASCIATION
The growing together, or fusion, of different parts of a plant. This is where leaves and blooms sometimes fuse together.

FEEDING
Applying additional plant nutrients to the compost in an effort to enhance growth or remedy deficiencies in the compost. This can also be carried out by a foliar feed, where the leaves and plant are sprayed with the feed.

FERTILIZATION
This is the union of male and female cells. This is accomplished by transferring pollen from the Stamens (male) to the Stigma (female) part of the plant. This can be done by wind, insects, birds or when carried out under controlled conditions by a Hybridizer when deliberately crossing two species or cultivars.

FIBROUS ROOTS
The white roots produced from the main fleshy roots vital for taking up of water and nutrients, essential for healthy growth. It is these roots, particularly in fuchsia`s, that are attacked by the grub of the Vine weevil resulting in the death of the plant.

FILAMENT
The stalk of the Stamen.

FINAL STOP
The last removal of the growing tip which a plant receives before being allowed to grow to flowering stage.

FIRST STOP
The removal of the growing tip of a rooted cutting to encourage branching into the required shape.

GENE
A unit of inheritance; a length of DNA in a chromosome that codes for a particular characteristic.

GENUS
The name given to a group of closely related species, for example Fuchsia.

HERMAPHRODITE
Flowers which have both male and female parts.

HYBRID
A cross between two species, sub-species or varieties.

HYPANTHIUM
The outer parts of a flower that form a protective tube and attract pollinators to the Stigma.

INFLORESCENCE
Of flowers - usually arranged around a single axis, as in F. paniculata or F. arborescens.

INTERNODE
The portion of the stem between two nodes. Rooting from this section is described as `internodal`.

LANCEOLATE
Lance spear shaped, when associated with leaf shape.

MULTIFLOWERING
Carrying more than a single bloom in each leaf axil; for example `Kelly`s Dream`. This allows more blooms to be produced after each final stop. This is not applied to triphylla types.

MUTATION
A change in the sequence of material in chromosome chains which results in changes to the foliage or flower, commonly known as a `sport`.

NODE
Part of the stem from which a leaf or bud arises. when taking cuttings, roots form most readily from this point.

NUTRIENTS
The food used by the plant from the growing medium, necessary for sustained and healthy growth.

OVARY
The part containing the ovules which, after fertilization, swells and encloses the seed.

OVATE
Of leaves, looking like a flattened egg and pointed at the narrowest end.

OVER-WINTERING
The storage of plants during the resting period, the winter months, so that the tissue of the plants remain alive although dormant.

PANICLES
A branched inflorescence consisting of a number of racemes.

PEDICEL
The flower stalk - attached from the leaf joint to the ovary (seed pod).

PERIPHERAL
On the outside or periphery; of flowers carried on the ends of branches.

PETAL
A division of the corolla.

PETALOIDS
Normally used to describe the smaller outer petals of the corolla. These are not counted when determining the size of the bloom (ie; single, double etc).

PETIOLE
The leaf stalk.

PHOTOSYNTHESIS
The process by which the chlorophyll in chloroplasts uses the energy of the sun to generate carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water.

PHOTOTROPISM
The plants response to light by moving in relation to the source of the light. Shoots and leaves are positively phototropic. Roots are usually negatively phototropic, or have no response. This is the reason for `turning` your plants on a daily basis to ensure even growth. This can also be used to advantage by producing `standards` more quickly by placing a chosen plant or cutting in a place where ...

PILOSE
Hairy.

PINCH
To remove the growing tip of the plant, or cutting, to produce bushiness.

PISTIL
The female part of the flower,consisting of the ovary (seed pod), style and stigma.

POT ON
To transfer the plant from one size of pot to a larger one so that there will be a continuous supply of nutrients.

POT-BOUND
When the plant container is full of roots to such an extent that the plant will become starved of nutrients.

POTTING UP
Transferring a seedling or rooted cutting from its initial seedbox, tray or propagator into a plant pot.

PROPAGATION
Increasing of stock by means of seeds or by rooting cuttings (see article on this site).

PRUNING
The shortening of laterals or roots to enhance the shape of the plant or to remove a damaged or dead portion.

RAECEME
A flower-cluster with the separate flowers attached by short equal stalks at equal distances along a central stem.

RECURVED
Bent backwards, usually of sepals.

REFLEXED
Synonymous with recurved.

RUBBING OUT
The removal of unwanted side growths, for example on a standard stem, usually in early bud stage.

RUST
A fungal diseases which infects a variety of plants, including fuchsias.

SCANDENT
Of fuchsias that would normally be unable to raise themselves above the ground when they climb or are supported by other plants.

SCLEROTIZED
Hardened.

SELF-POLLINATION
The transference of pollen from anther to stigma of the same flower or another flower on the same plant.

SEMI-DOUBLE
A fuchsia with five, six or seven petals.

SEPALS
The outermost part of the flower; four sepals and the tube form the calyx.

SHADING
The exclusion of some of the rays of the sun by the use of blinds, netting or glass colourant.

SHAPING
To grow a plant into a definite shape by means of training the laterals or by selective pinching out of the growing tips.

SIBLINGS
Offspring of the same female and male parents.

SINGLE
A fuchsia with only four petals.

SPECIES
The smallest unit of classification. Individuals in a species are assumed to have emanated from a single original genetic source and are sexually compatible with each other.

SPORT
A shoot differing in character from the typical growth of the parent plant, often giving rise to a new cultivar, which must be propagated vegetatively.

STAMEN
The male part of the flower comprising the filaments and anthers.

STIGMA
The part of the pistil to which the pollen grains adhere.

STOP
To remove the growing tip of the plant.

STRIKING
As in striking a cutting - The insertion of a prepared cutting into a suitable rooting compost.

STYLE
The stalk that is attached to the stigma which leads to the ovary (seed pod).

SUB-SPECIES
A partially differentiated group within a species.

SUBERECT
Partially or sometimes erect; usually of flowers.

SYSTEMICS
Insecticides or fungicides taken up by the roots and carried into the sap of the plant, thus causing it to become poisonous to sucking insects or protected from the attack of viruses. Can also be absorbed through the foliage if applied in spray form.

TERMINAL
At the extremities or ends of the branches.

TERNATE
Arranged in threes; of leaves or blooms at a joint.

TRACE ELEMENTS
Nutrients required by a plant to maintain steady and healthy growth (boron,copper, magnesium and zinc).

TRIPHYLLA
Like F. triphylla, with terminal corymbs of long tapered flowers.

TUBE
The elongated part of the calyx, correctly called the hypanthium.

TURGID
The condition of the plant cells after absorption of water to full capacity.

TURNING
The term used to describe the turning of a plant on a daily basis in an effort to achieve balanced growth from all directions.

VARIETY
Botanically a variant of the species, but formerly used to denote what is now more commonly called a cultivar.

VILLOUS
Covered with long weak hair.

VIRUS
An agent causing systemic disease. It is too small to be seen other than with a powerful microscope, but is transmitted very easily.

WHIP
A term given to a single stem of a plant being grown with a view to producing a standard.

WHORLS
A set of appendages that are arranged in a circle around a single axis. A ring of leaves or flowers.