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mondofacto - Online Medical Dictionary
Category: Health and Medicine > Medical Dictionary
Date & country: 26/01/2008, UK
Words: 138795


accessory suprarenal glands
Isolated, often minute, masses of suprarenal tissue sometimes found near the main glands or in the broad ligament or the epididymis. ... Synonym: glandulae suprarenales accessoriae. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accessory symptom
A symptom that usually but not always accompanies a certain disease, as distinguished from a pathognomonic symptom. ... Synonym: assident symptom, concomitant symptom. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accessory thyroid
Synonym for accessory thyroid gland ... An isolated mass, or one of several such masses, of thyroid tissue, sometimes present in the side of the neck, or just above the hyoid bone (suprahyoid accessory thyroid gland), or even as low as the arch of the aorta. ... Synonym: glandula thyroidea accessoria, accessory thyroid, prehyoid gland, suprahyoid gla …

accessory thyroid gland
An isolated mass, or one of several such masses, of thyroid tissue, sometimes present in the side of the neck, or just above the hyoid bone (suprahyoid accessory thyroid gland), or even as low as the arch of the aorta. ... Synonym: glandula thyroidea accessoria, accessory thyroid, prehyoid gland, suprahyoid gland, thyroidea accessoria, thyroidea ima …

accessory tragus
Small nodules present at birth, anterior to the tragus, derived from first branchial arch remnants and often containing central cartilage. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accessory tubercle
Synonym for accessory process ... A small apophysis at the posterior part of the base of the transverse process of each of the lumbar vertebrae. ... Synonym: processus accessorius, accessory tubercle. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accessory vertebral vein
<anatomy, vein> A vein that accompanies the vertebral vein but passes through the foramen of the transverse process of the seventh cervical vertebra and opens independently into the brachiocephalic vein. ... Synonym: vena vertebralis accessoria. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accessory visual apparatus
Synonym for accessory organs of the eye ... The eyelids, with lashes and eyebrows, lacrimal apparatus, conjunctival sac, and extrinsic muscles of the eyeball. ... Synonym: organa oculi accessoria, accessory organs, accessory visual apparatus, adnexa oculi, appendages of eye. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accessory volar ligaments
Synonym for palmar ligaments ... The fibrocartilaginous plates, one located on the anterior aspect of each metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joint, that are firmly attached to the bases of the phalanges and the heads of the next proximal bones; they are grooved to accommodate the long flexor tendons. ... Synonym: ligamenta palmaria, accessory v …

acciaccatura
A short grace note, one semitone below the note to which it is prefixed; used especially in organ music. Now used as equivalent to the short appoggiatura. ... Origin: It, from acciaccare to crush. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

accident
1. Literally, a befalling; an event that takes place without one's foresight or expectation; an undesigned, sudden, and unexpected event; chance; contingency; often, an undesigned and unforeseen occurrence of an afflictive or unfortunate character; a casualty; a mishap; as, to die by an accident. 'Of moving accidents by flood and field.' (Shak) 'Th …

accident neurosis
Synonym for traumatic neurosis ... Any functional nervous disorder following an accident or injury. ... See: posttraumatic stress disorder. ... Synonym: accident neurosis, posttraumatic neurosis. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accident proneness
Tendency toward involvement in accidents. Implies certain personality characteristics which predispose to accidents. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

accident-prone
1. Having a greater number of accidents than would be expected of the average person in similar circumstances. ... 2. Having personality characteristics predisposing one to accidents. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accidental
Happening unexpectedly or by chance. ... (18 Nov 1997) ...

accidental abortion
Abortion due to a fall, blow, or other injury. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accidental falls
Falls due to slipping or tripping which result in injury. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

accidental host
One that harbors an organism which usually does not infect it. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accidental hypothermia
Unintentional decrease in body temperature, especially in the newborn, infants, and elderly, particularly during operations. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accidental image
Synonym for afterimage ... Continuation of visual impression after cessation of stimuli causing the original image. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

accidental murmur
An evanescent cardiac murmur not due to valvular lesion. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accidental symptom
Any morbid phenomenon coincidentally occurring in the course of a disease, but having no relation with it. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accidents, occupational
Unforeseen occurrences, especially of an injurious character due to factors involving one's employment. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

accidents, radiation
Accidental dispersal of radioactive materials from a radiation source. Accidents at nuclear reactors can involve large groups of the population from dispersion of radioactivity into the environment and through fallout or a few individuals with high injurious doses. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

accidents, traffic
Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to automobiles (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), bicycling, and motorcycles but not off-road motor vehicles, railroads nor snowmobiles. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

accipiter
Origin: L, hawk. ... 1. <ornithology> A genus of rapacious birds; one of the Accipitres or Raptores. ... 2. <surgery> A bandage applied over the nose, resembling the claw of a hawk. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

accipitres
<ornithology> The order that includes rapacious birds. They have a hooked bill, and sharp, strongly curved talons. There are three families, represented by the vultures, the falcons or hawks, and the owls. ... Origin: L, hawks. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

accipitrine
<zoology> Like or belonging to the Accipitres; raptorial; hawklike. ... Origin: Cf. F. Accipitrin. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acclimating fever
Elevated temperature with malaise that occurs upon working in a very hot environment. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acclimation
Synonym for acclimatization ... Adaptation to a new environment or to a change in the old. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

acclimatisation
1. <physiology> The physiological process through which an organism grows accustomed or adapts to a new environment. ... 2. <microbiology> In mcrobial cultures, this can involve enzymatic changes that allow it to use an new nutrient source for energy. ... (06 May 1997) ...

acclimatization
Adaptation to a new environment or to a change in the old. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

acclimatize
To inure or habituate to a climate different from that which is natural; to adapt to the peculiarities of a foreign or strange climate; said of man, the inferior animals, or plants. ... Origin: Acclimatized; Acclimatizing. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

accole forms
Synonym for applique forms ... A term applied to the manner in which the ring stage of Plasmodium falciparum parasitises the marginal portion of erythrocytes. ... Synonym: accole forms. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accommodation
<ophthalmology, physiology> Adjustment, especially that of the eye for various distances resulting in pupil constriction or dilatation. ... Origin: L. Accommodare = to fit to ... (18 Nov 1997) ...

accommodation of eye
The increase in thickness and convexity of the eye's lens in order to focus the image of an external object upon the retina. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accommodation of nerve
<anatomy, nerve> The property of a nerve by which it adjusts to a slowly increasing strength of stimulus, so that its threshold of excitation is greater than it would be were the stimulus strength to have risen more rapidly. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accommodation reflex
Increased convexity of the lens, due to contraction of the ciliary muscle and relaxation of the suspensory ligament, to maintain a distinct retinal image. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accommodation, ocular
The dioptric adjustment of the eye (to attain maximal sharpness of retinal imagery for an object of regard) referring to the ability, to the mechanism, or to the process. It is the effecting of refractive changes by changes in the shape of the crystalline lens. Loosely, it refers to ocular adjustments for vision at various distances. ... (12 Dec 199 …

accommodative
Relating to accommodation. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accommodative asthenopia
Asthenopia due to errors of refraction and excessive contraction of the ciliary muscle. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accommodative convergence
The meter angle of convergence expressed in diopters; equal to the product of the meter angles of convergence times the interpupillary distance measured in centimeters. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accommodative strabismus
Strabismus in which the severity of deviation varies with accommodation. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accompanying vein
Synonym for vena comitans ... A vein accompanying another structure. ... Synonym: accompanying vein, companion vein. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accomplice
A bacterium which accompanies the main infecting agent in a mixed infection and which influences the virulence of the main organism. ... Origin: M.E., fr. O.Fr., fr. L. Comples, closely connected ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accomplish
1. To complete, as time or distance. 'That He would accomplish seventy years in the desolations of Jerusalem.' (Dan. Ix. 2) 'He had accomplished half a league or more.' (Prescott) ... 2. To bring to an issue of full success; to effect; to perform; to execute fully; to fulfill; as, to accomplish a design, an object, a promise. 'This that is written m …

accord
1. To make to agree or correspond; to suit one thing to another; to adjust; followed by to. 'Her hands accorded the lute's music to the voice.' (Sidney) ... 2. To bring to an agreement, as persons; to reconcile; to settle, adjust, harmonize, or compose, as things; as, to accord suits or controversies. 'When they were accorded from the fray.' (Spense …

accordion graft
A skin graft in which multiple slits have been made, so it can be stretched to cover a large area. ... Synonym: mesh graft. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accost
1. To join side to side; to border; hence, to sail along the coast or side of. 'So much [of Lapland] as accosts the sea.' ... 2. To approach; to make up to. ... 3. To speak to first; to address; to greet. 'Him, Satan thus accosts.' ... Origin: F. Accoster, LL. Accostare to bring side by side; L. Ad + costa rib, side. See Coast, and cf. Accoast. ... Sou …

accosted
Supported on both sides by other charges; also, side by side. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

accouchement
Childbirth, particularly parturition. ... See: birth. ... Origin: Fr. From coucher, to lie down ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accouchement force
Forced, artificially hastened delivery, by means of forceps, version, etc.; originally applied to rapid dilation of the cervix with the hands, with version and forcible extraction of the foetus. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accoucheur
French for a male obstetrician. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

accoucheur's hand
Position of the hand in tetany or in muscular dystrophy; the fingers are flexed at the metacarpophalangeal joints and extended at the phalangeal joints, with the thumb flexed and adducted into the palm; in resemblance to the position of the physician's hand in making a vaginal examination. ... Synonym: main d'accoucheur, obstetrical hand. ... (05 Mar …

accoucheuse
French for a female obstetrician or midwife. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

account books
Books in which personal or commercial accounts of financial transactions are recorded. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

accounting
System of recording financial transactions. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

accounts payable and receivable
Short-term debt obligations and assets occurring in the regular course of operational transactions. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

accredit
1. To put or bring into credit; to invest with credit or authority; to sanction. 'His censure will . . . Accredit his praises.' (Cowper) 'These reasons . . . Which accredit and fortify mine opinion.' (Shelton) ... 2. To send with letters credential, as an ambassador, envoy, or diplomatic agent; to authorise, as a messenger or delegate. 'Beton . . . …

accreditation
Certification as complying with a standard set by non-governmental organizations, applied for by institutions, programs, and facilities on a voluntary basis. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

accrementitial
<physiology> Pertaining to accremention. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

accrementition
<physiology> The process of generation by development of blastema, or fission of cells, in which the new formation is in all respect like the individual from which it proceeds. ... See: Accresce, Increment. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

accrescent
<plant biology> Increasing in size with age, as the calyx of some plants after flowering. ... (15 Jan 1998) ...

accrete
1. Characterised by accretion; made up; as, accrete matter. ... 2. <botany> Grown together. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

accretio cordis
Adhesion of the pericardium to adjacent extracardiac structures. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accretion
1. Increase by addition to the periphery of material of the same nature as that already present; e.g., the manner of growth of crystals. ... Synonym: accrementition. ... 2. In dentistry, foreign material (usually plaque or calculus) collecting on the surface of a tooth or in a cavity. ... 3. A growing together. ... Origin: L. Accretio, fr. Ad, to, + cr …

accretion lines
Line's seen in microscopic sections of the enamel, marking successive layers of added material. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accretionary growth
Growth by an increase of intercellular material. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accrochage
Intermittent synchronization of two different rhythms of the heart with one influencing the behaviour of the other when neither is dominant; seen in cases of atrioventricular dissociation when an atrial beat falls shortly after a ventricular beat, the latter causing the atrial beat to occur sooner than expected. ... Origin: Fr. Hooking, hitching ... …

acculturation
Process of cultural change in which one group or members of a group assimilates various cultural patterns from another. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

accumbent
<botany> The orientation of an embryo, with the radicle lying against the edges of the two cotyledons. ... (15 Jan 1998) ...

accumulating shear
A feller-buncher shearhead that is capable of accumulating and holding 2 or more cut stems. ... (05 Dec 1998) ...

accumulation
The action or process of accumulating, state of being or having accumulated, a collecting together. ... <pharmacology> Repeated exposures to a chemical or drug may result in the progressive increase of its concentration in an organism, organ or tissue. Illness or other effects may increase with successive doses. ... Factors involved in accumula …

accumulation analysis
A technique in which an intermediate of a metabolic pathway accumulates due to selective inhibition of a particular step in that pathway or in a mutant that is deficient in a certain step. The intermediate is then isolated, analyzed, and identified. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accumulation disease
A disease characterised by abnormal accumulation of a metabolic product in certain cells and tissues; examples include the mucopolysaccharidoses, lipoidoses. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accumulator
1. One who, or that which, accumulates, collects, or amasses. ... 2. <mechanics> An apparatus by means of which energy or power can be stored, such as the cylinder or tank for storing water for hydraulic elevators, the secondary or storage battery used for accumulating the energy of electrical charges, etc. ... 3. A system of elastic springs fo …

accuracy
The degree to which a measurement, or an estimate based on measurements, represents the true value of the attribute that is being measured. In the laboratory accuracy of a test is determined when possible by comparing results from the test in question with results generated from an established reference method. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

accustomable
Habitual; customary; wonted. 'Accustomable goodness.' ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

accustomably
According to custom; ordinarily; customarily. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

accustomance
Custom; habitual use. ... Origin: OF. Accoustumance, F. Accoutumance. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

accustomarily
Customarily. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

accustomary
Usual; customary. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

accustomed
1. Familiar through use; usual; customary. 'An accustomed action.' ... 2. Frequented by customers. 'A well accustomed shop.' ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

accustomedness
Habituation. 'Accustomedness to sin hardens the heart.' (Bp. Pearce) ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

ACE
Synonym for angiotensin-converting enzyme ... <enzyme> This hydrolase enzyme cleaves the decapeptide angiotensin I (biologically inactive) to form active angiotensin II by angiotensin-converting enzyme which removes a dipeptide (histidylleucine) from angiotensin I. ... Angiotensin II causes contraction of vascular smooth muscle and thus raises …

ACE inhibitor
<pharmacology> A group of antihypertensive medications that work by inhibiting an enzyme (angiotensin-converting enzyme) that is important in the regulation of blood pressure. ... Studies have also indicated that it may help prevent or slow the progression of kidney disease in patients with diabetes. ... Examples include: captopril, ramipril, e …

ACE level
<investigation> This is a blood test which measures the concentration of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in the bloodstream. ... Elevations in angiotensin-converting enzyme are seen sarcoidosis, histoplasmosis, alcoholic cirrhosis, asbestosis, berylliosis, diabetes, Hodgkin's disease, hyperthyroidism, amyloidosis, primary biliary cirrhosis …

acebutolol
<chemical> N-(3-acetyl-4-(2-hydroxy-3-((1-methylethyl)amino)propoxy)phenyl)butanamide. A cardioselective beta-adrenergic antagonist with little effect on the bronchial receptors. The drug has stabilizing and quinidine-like effects on cardiac rhythm as well as weak inherent sympathomimetic action. ... Pharmacological action: adrenergic beta-ant …

acecainide
<chemical> 4-(acetylamino)-n-(2-(diethylamino)ethyl)benzamide. Major metabolite of procainamide. Its anti-arrhythmic action may cause cardiac toxicity in kidney failure. ... Pharmacological action: anti-arrhythmia agents. ... Chemical name: Benzamide, 4-(acetylamino)-N-(2-(diethylamino)ethyl)- ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

aceclidine
3-Quinuclidinol acetate ester;a cholinergic drug used for topical therapy of glaucoma. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acedapsone
<chemical> Acetylated sulfone that is slowly metabolised to give long-term, low blood levels of dapsone. It has antimicrobial and antimalarial action, but is mainly used as a depot leprostatic agent. ... Pharmacological action: anti-infective agents, antimalarials, leprostatic agents. ... Chemical name: Acetamide, N,N'-(sulfonyldi-4,1-phenylene …

acedia
A mental syndrome, the chief features of which are listlessness, carelessness, apathy, and melancholia. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acefylline piperazine
Piperazine theophylline-7-acetate;a diuretic and smooth muscle relaxant. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acellular
<microbiology> Describes any organism or tissue that is a mass of protoplasm which is not divided into cells, such as the plasmodium of some slime molds and the hyphae of some fungi. ... (12 Mar 1998) ...

acellular vaccine
<immunology, pharmacology, virology> Vaccine consisting of antigenic parts of cells. ... (13 Nov 1997) ...

acelom
Absence of a true celom or body cavity lined with mesothelium; typically found in Platyhelminthes (flatworms), which have a syncytial mass of parenchymal cells instead of a true body cavity. ... Origin: G. A-priv. + koiloma, hollow (celom) ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acelomate
Not having a celom or body cavity. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acelomatous
Synonym for acelomate ... Not having a celom or body cavity. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acenaphthene
<chemistry> Tricyclic ethylene-bridged naphthalene derivatives. They are found in petroleum residues and coal tar and used as dye intermediates, in the manufacture of plastics, and in insecticide and fungicides. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

acenesthesia
Absence of the normal sensation of physical existence, or of the consciousness of visceral functioning. ... Origin: G. A-priv. + koinos, common, + aisthesis, feeling ... (05 Mar 2000) ...