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mondofacto - Online Medical Dictionary
Category: Health and Medicine > Medical Dictionary
Date & country: 26/01/2008, UK
Words: 138795


abundance
An overflowing fullness; ample sufficiency; great plenty; profusion; copious supply; superfluity; wealth: strictly applicable to quantity only, but sometimes used of number. 'It is lamentable to remember what abundance of noble blood hath been shed with small benefit to the Christian state.' (Raleigh) ... Synonym: Exuberance, plenteousness, plenty, …

abundant
Fully sufficient; plentiful; in copious supply; followed by in, rarely by with. 'Abundant in goodness and truth. ... <mathematics> ' Abundant number, a number, the sum of whose aliquot parts exceeds the number itself. Thus, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, the aliquot parts of 12, make the number 16. This is opposed to a deficient number, as 14, whose aliquot p …

abuse
1. Improper treatment or use; application to a wrong or bad purpose; misuse; as, an abuse of our natural powers; an abuse of civil rights, or of privileges or advantages; an abuse of language. 'Liberty may be endangered by the abuses of liberty, as well as by the abuses of power.' (Madison) ... 2. Physical ill treatment; injury. 'Rejoice . . . at th …

abutilon
<botany> A genus of malvaceous plants of many species, found in the torrid and temperate zones of both continents. ... Synonym: Indian mallow. ... Origin: Ar. Aubutilun. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

abutment
<dentistry> The teeth on either side of a missing tooth. ... (08 Jan 1998) ...

ABVD
<abbreviation> A chemotherapy regimen of Adriamycin (doxorubicin), bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine; used to treat neoplastic diseases, such as Hodgkin's disease, shown to be resistant to MOPP therapy. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abvolt
The CGS electromagnetic unit of difference of potential equal to 10-8 volt. The potential difference between two points such that 1 erg of work will be done when 1 abcoulomb of charge moves from point to point. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abysmal
Pertaining to, or resembling, an abyss; bottomless; unending; profound. 'Geology gives one the same abysmal extent of time that astronomy does of space.' (Carlyle) ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

abyss
1. A bottomless or unfathomed depth, gulf, or chasm; hence, any deep, immeasurable, and, specifically, hell, or the bottomless pit. 'Ye powers and spirits of this nethermost abyss.' (Milton) 'The throne is darkness, in the abyss of light.' (Dryden) ... 2. Infinite time; a vast intellectual or moral depth. 'The abysses of metaphysical theology.' (Mac …

abyssal
Belonging to, or resembling, an abyss; unfathomable. ... <physics> Abyssal zone, one of the belts or zones into which Sir E. Forbes divides the bottom of the sea in describing its plants, animals, etc. It is the one furthest from the shore, embracing all beyond one hundred fathoms deep. Hence, abyssal animals, plants, etc. ... Origin: Cf. Abysm …

abzyme
<immunology> An antibody with catalytic activity. ... (06 May 1997) ...

Ac1-proteinase
<enzyme> Proteolylic haemorrhagic toxin for trimeresurus flavoviridis ... Registry number: EC 3.4.99.- ... Synonym: ac1-protease ... (26 Jun 1999) ...

Ac2-proteinase
<enzyme> From agkistrodon acutus venom ... Registry number: EC 3.4.99.- ... Synonym: ac2-protease ... (26 Jun 1999) ...

Ac3-proteinase
<enzyme> Isolated from venom of agkistrodon acutus; mw 57,000 ... Registry number: EC 3.4.99.- ... Synonym: ac3-protease ... (26 Jun 1999) ...

Ac4-proteinase
<enzyme> One of proteinases of venom of agkistrodon acutus and has haemorrhagic activity ... Registry number: EC 3.4.99.- ... Synonym: ac4-protease ... (26 Jun 1999) ...

Ac5-proteinase
<enzyme> Isolated from venom of agkistrodon acutus ... Registry number: EC 3.4.99.- ... Synonym: ac5-protease ... (26 Jun 1999) ...

acacia
Origin: L. From Gr.; orig. The name of a thorny tree found in Egypt; prob. Fr. The root ak to be sharp. See Acute. ... 1. A genus of leguminous trees and shrubs. Nearly 300 species are Australian or Polynesian, and have terete or vertically compressed leaf stalks, instead of the bipinnate leaves of the much fewer species of America, Africa, etc. Ver …

academic dissertations
Formal written discourses presented, usually, to fulfill requirements for an academic degree. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

academic medical centres
Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

academies and institutes
Organizations representing specialised fields which are accepted as authoritative; may be non-governmental, university or an independent research organization, e.g., national academy of sciences, brookings institution, etc. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

academy
Origin: F. Academie, L. Academia. Cf. Academe. ... 1. A garden or grove near Athens (so named from the hero Academus), where Plato and his followers held their philosophical conferences; hence, the school of philosophy of which Plato was head. ... 2. An institution for the study of higher learning; a college or a university. Popularly, a school, or s …

acadian
Of or pertaining to Acadie, or Nova Scotia. 'Acadian farmers.' . ... A native of Acadie. ... <geology> Acadian epoch, an epoch at the beginning of the American paleozoic time, and including the oldest American rocks known to be fossiliferous. See Geology. ... <ornithology> Acadian owl, a small North American owl (Nyctule Acadica); the saw- …

acajou
<botany> The cashew tree; also, its fruit. See Cashew. ... The mahogany tree; also, its timber. ... Origin: F. See Cashew. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acalculia
A form of aphasia characterised by the inability to perform simple mathematical problems; found with lesions of various areas of the cerebral hemispheres, and often an early sign of dementia. ... Origin: G. A-priv. + L. Calculo, to reckon ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acalculous cholecystitis
<radiology> 5-10% of acute cholecystitis aetiology: depressed motility and starvation: trauma, burns, surgery, TPN, anaesthesia, narcotics, decreased blood flow through cystic artery: congestive heart failure, arteriosclerosis, polyarteritis nodosa, systemic lupus erythematosus, diabetes, shock, obstruction of cystic duct by extrinsic inflamm …

acalephae
A group of Coelenterata, including the Medusae or jellyfishes, and hydroids; so called from the stinging power they possess. Sometimes called sea nettles. ... Origin: NL, from Gr, a nettle. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acalephan
<zoology> One of the Acalephae. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acalephoid
<zoology> Belonging to or resembling the Acalephae or jellyfishes. ... Origin: Acaleph. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acalysinous
<botany> Without a calyx, or outer floral envelope. ... Origin: Gr. Priv. + calyx. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acampsia
<rheumatology> Stiffening or rigidity of a joint for any reason. ... (06 Oct 1997) ...

acantha
1. <botany> A prickle. ... 2. <zoology> A spine or prickly fin. ... 3. <anatomy> The vertebral column; the spinous process of a vertebra. ... Origin: Gr. Thorn, fr. Point. See Acute. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acanthaceous
1. Armed with prickles, as a plant. ... 2. <botany> Of, pertaining to, or resembling, the family of plants of which the acanthus is the type. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acanthamoeba
A genus of free-living soil amoebae that produces no flagellate stage. Its organisms are pathogens for several infections in humans and have been found in the eye, bone, brain, and respiratory tract. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

acanthamoeba keratitis
Infection of the cornea by an ameboid protozoan which may cause corneal ulceration leading to blindness. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

acanthamoebiasis
Infection by free-living soil amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba that may result in a necrotizing dermal or tissue invasion, or a fulminating and usually fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acanthella
An intermediate larva stage of Acanthocephala, formed within the arthropod host; a preinfective, nonencysted stage leading to the infective cystacanth. ... Origin: G. Akantha, thorn, spine ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acanthesthesia
Paresthesia of a pinprick. ... Origin: G. Akantha, thorn, + aisthesis, sensation ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

Acanthia lectularia
Early name for Cimex lectularius. ... Origin: G. Akantha, thorn, prickle; L. Lectus, a bed ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acanthine
Of, pertaining to, or resembling, the plant acanthus. ... Origin: L. Acanthinus, Gr, thorny, fr. See Acanthus. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acanthion
The tip of the anterior nasal spine. ... Synonym: akanthion. ... Origin: G. Akantha, thorn ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acantho-
A spinous process; spiny, thorny. ... Origin: G. Akantha, a thorn, the backbone, the spine, fr. Ake, a point, + anthos, a flower ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acanthocarpous
<botany> Having the fruit covered with spines. ... Origin: Gr. Thorn + fruit. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acanthocephala
<zoology> A group of intestinal worms, having the proboscis armed with recurved spines. ... Origin: NL, from Gr. A spine, thorn + head. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acanthocephaliasis
An illness caused by infection with a species of Acanthocephala. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acanthocephalous
<zoology> Having a spiny head, as one of the Acanthocephala. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

Acanthocheilonema
A genus of filarial worms parasitic in man, now considered part of the genus Mansonella. ... Origin: acantho-+ G. Cheilos, lip, + nema, thread ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acanthocyte
An erythrocyte characterised by multiple spiny cytoplasmic projections, as in acanthocytosis. ... Synonym: acanthrocyte. ... Origin: acantho-+ G. Kytos, cell ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acanthocytes
Erythrocytes with protoplasmic projections giving the cell a thorny appearance. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

acanthocytosis
<haematology> A rare condition where the majority of red blood cells are acanthocytes (red blood cells with multiple spiny cytoplasmic projections), a feature of abetalipoproteinaemia. ... (27 Sep 1997) ...

acanthocytosis with chorea
Synonym for chorea-acanthocytosis ... A slowly progressive familial chorea with associated mental deterioration, diminished deep tendon reflexes, bilateral atrophy of the putamen and caudate nuclei and acanthocytosis (thorny appearance of blood erythrocytes); the disorder typically begins around late adolescence; inheritance is usually autosomal rec …

acanthoid
Spine-shaped. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acantholysis
Separation of the prickle cells of the stratum spinosum of the epidermis, resulting in atrophy of the prickle cell layer. It is seen in diseases such as pemphigus vulgaris and keratosis follicularis. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

acanthoma
<tumour> A tumour formed by proliferation of epithelial squamous cells. ... See: keratoacanthoma. ... Origin: acantho-+ G. -oma, tumour ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acanthoma adenoides cysticum
Synonym for trichoepithelioma ... <tumour> Multiple small benign nodules, occurring mostly on the skin of the face, derived from basal cells of hair follicles enclosing small keratin cysts; frequent autosomal dominant inheritance. ... Synonym: acanthoma adenoides cysticum, Brooke's tumour, epithelioma adenoides cysticum, hereditary multiple tri …

acanthoma fissuratum
A fissure bordered by acanthosis developing at a site of friction by spectacle frames, usually behind the ears. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acanthopodia
Toothlike pseudopodia observed in some amoebae, typically in members of the genus Acanthamoeba. ... Origin: acantho-+ G. Pous, podos, foot ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acanthopodina
A suborder of ameboid protozoa. Characteristics include subpseudopodia that are more or less finely tipped, occasionally filiform, commonly furcate hyaline, and produced from a broad hyaline lobe. Cysts are usually formed and nuclear division is mesomitotic or metamitotic. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

acanthopodious
<botany> Having spinous petioles. ... Origin: Gr. Thorn +, foot. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acanthopteri
<zoology> A group of teleostean fishes having spiny fins. See Acanthopterygii. ... Origin: NL, from Gr. Thorn + wing, fin. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acanthopterous
1. <zoology> Spiny-winged. ... 2. <zoology> Acanthopterygious. ... Origin: Gr. Spine + wing. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acanthopterygian
<zoology> Belonging to the order of fishes having spinose fins, as the perch. ... A spiny-finned fish. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acanthopterygii
<zoology> An order of fishes having some of the rays of the dorsal, ventral, and anal fins unarticulated and spinelike, as the perch. ... Origin: NL, from Gr. Thorn + fin, dim. Fr. Wing. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acanthopterygious
<zoology> Having fins in which the rays are hard and spinelike; spiny-finned. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acanthor
The spindle-shaped embryo, with rostellar hooks and body spines, formed within the egg shell of Acanthocephala; this stage burrows into the body cavity of its first intermediate host, usually a crustacean in aquatic cycles, or insects in terrestrial cycles. ... Origin: G. Akantha, thorn or spine ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acanthorrhexis
Rupture of the intercellular bridges of the prickle cell layer of the epidermis, as in contact-type dermatitis. ... See: spongiosis. ... Origin: acantho + G. Rhexis, rupture ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acanthosis
An increase in the thickness of the stratum spinosum of the epidermis. ... Synonym: hyperacanthosis. ... Origin: acantho-+ G. -osis, condition ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acanthosis nigricans
<radiology> Pre-malignant skin disorder, papillomatosis, pigmentation, hyperkeratosis, multiple filling defects in oesophagus, increased risk of carcinoma in stomach and abdomen ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

acanthotic
Pertaining to or characteristic of acanthosis. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acanthrocyte
Synonym for acanthocyte ... An erythrocyte characterised by multiple spiny cytoplasmic projections, as in acanthocytosis. ... Synonym: acanthrocyte. ... Origin: acantho-+ G. Kytos, cell ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acanthrocytosis
Synonym for acanthocytosis ... <haematology> A rare condition where the majority of red blood cells are acanthocytes (red blood cells with multiple spiny cytoplasmic projections), a feature of abetalipoproteinaemia. ... (27 Sep 1997) ...

acanthus
Origin: L, from Gr. Cf. Acantha. ... 1. <botany> A genus of herbaceous prickly plants, found in the south of Europe, Asia Minor, and India; bear's-breech. ... 2. An ornament resembling the foliage or leaves of the acanthus (Acanthus spinosus); used in the capitals of the Corinthian and Composite orders. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar …

acapnia
Less than the normal level of carbon dioxide in the blood. The opposite of hypercapnia. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

acapnial alkalosis
Synonym for respiratory alkalosis ... The alkalosis resulting from abnormal loss of CO2 produced by hyperventilation, either active or passive, with concomitant reduction in arterial plasma bicarbonate concentration. ... See: compensated alkalosis. ... Synonym: acapnial alkalosis. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acapsular
<botany> Having no capsule. ... Origin: Pref. A- not + capsular. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acarbia
An obsolete term denoting pronounced reduction in bicarbonate of the blood (hypocarbia). ... Origin: G. A-priv. + carbon ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acarbose 7-phosphotransferase
<enzyme> Catalyses reaction between ATP and acarbose to form acarbose 7-phosphate; isolated from actinoplanes; n-terminal amino acid sequence given in first source ... Registry number: EC 2.7.1.- ... Synonym: acarbose kinase ... (26 Jun 1999) ...

acardia
Congenital absence of the heart; a condition sometimes occurring in monozygotic twins or in the smaller, parasitic member of conjoined twins when its partner monopolises the placental blood supply. Acardia can also occur in triplet pregnancies. ... Origin: G. A-priv. + kardia, heart ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acardiac
Without a heart; as, an acardiac foetus. ... Origin: Gr.; priv. + heart. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acardiotrophia
An obsolete term for atrophy of the myocardium. ... Origin: G. A-priv. + kardia, heart, + trophe, nourishment ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acardius
A twin without a heart, parasitic on, or utilizing the placental circulation of, its mate. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acardius acephalus
Acephalocardius;an acardiac foetus in which the head and thoracic organs are absent. Ribs and vertebrae may be present, and upper limbs are either absent or defective. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acardius amorphus
A shapeless mass covered by skin and hair. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acardius anceps
An acardiac foetus with partly developed head and deformed face, trunk, and limbs. ... See: hemiacardius. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acari
A large, cosmopolitan order of arachnids comprising the mites and ticks, including parasites of plants, animals, and man, as well as several important disease vectors. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

acariasis
Any disease caused by mites, usually a skin infestation. ... See: mange. ... Synonym: acaridiasis, acarinosis. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acaricide
An agent that kills acarines; commonly used to denote chemicals that kill ticks. ... Origin: Mod. L. Acarus, a mite, fr. G. Akari + L. Caedo, to cut, kill ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acarid
A general term for a member of the family Acaridae or for a mite. ... Synonym: acaridan. ... Origin: G. Akari, mite ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

Acaridae
A family of the order Acarina, a large group of exceptionally small mites, usually 0.5 mm or less, abundant in dried fruits and meats, grain, meal, and flour; frequently a cause of severe dermatitis among persons hypersensitised by frequent handling of infested products. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acaridan
<zoology> One of a group of arachnids, including the mites and ticks. ... See: Acarus. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acaridiasis
Synonym for acariasis ... Any disease caused by mites, usually a skin infestation. ... See: mange. ... Synonym: acaridiasis, acarinosis. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acarina
<zoology> The group of Arachnida which includes the mites and ticks. Many species are parasitic, and cause diseases like the itch and mange. ... Origin: NL, from Gr. A mite. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acarine
<medicine> Of or caused by acari or mites; as, acarine diseases. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acarine dermatosis
An eruption caused by one of the acarine parasites. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acarinosis
Synonym for acariasis ... Any disease caused by mites, usually a skin infestation. ... See: mange. ... Synonym: acaridiasis, acarinosis. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acarodermatitis
A skin inflammation or eruption produced by a mite. ... Origin: G. Akari, mite, + derma (dermat-), skin ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acarodermatitis urticarioides
Infestation with the grain itch mite, Pyemotes ventricosus. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acaroid
<zoology> Shaped like or resembling a mite. ... Origin: NL, acarus a mite. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

acarology
The study of acarine parasites, the ticks and mites, and the diseases they transmit. ... Origin: G. Akari, mite, + logos, study ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acarophobia
<psychology> Morbid fear of small parasites, small particles, or of itching. ... Origin: G. Akari, mite, + phobos, fear ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

acarpellous
<botany> Having no carpels. ... Origin: Pref. A- not + carpel. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...