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mondofacto - Online Medical Dictionary
Category: Health and Medicine > Medical Dictionary
Date & country: 26/01/2008, UK
Words: 138795


abscission
<botany> The normal shedding from a plant of an organ that is mature or aged, for example a ripe fruit, an old leaf. Adj. Abscissile. ... (09 Oct 1997) ...

abscission cellulase
<enzyme> High sequence conservation between bean and soybean abscission cellulase (bac and sac respectively); nucleotide sequence given in first source ... Registry number: EC 3.2.1.- ... Synonym: bac gene product, bean, sac gene product, soybean ... (26 Jun 1999) ...

absconsio
A recess, cavity, or depression; used especially in osteology to denote a bony cavity which accommodates the head of another bone. ... Origin: Mod. L. Fr. Abs-condo, pp. -conditus or -consus, to hide ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abscopal
Denoting the effect that irradiation of a tissue has on remote nonirradiated tissue. ... Origin: ab-+ G.skopos, target, + -al ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abscopal effect
A reaction produced following irradiation but occurring outside the zone of actual radiation absorption. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absence
Paroxysmal attacks of impaired consciousness, occasionally accompanied by spasm or twitching of cephalic muscles, which usually can be brought on by hyperventilation; depending on the type and severity of the absence, the EEG may show an abrupt onset of a 3/sec spike and wave pattern as in simple absence, or in atypical cases, a 4/sec spike and wav …

absence seizure
<neurology> A type of seizure that in contrast to the grand mal seizure, are noted for their brevity and for the degree of loss of awareness (brief staring spell) accompanied by minimal motor manifestations. A common form of childhood epilepsy. ... (06 Oct 1997) ...

absent
1. Being away from a place; withdrawn from a place; not present. 'Expecting absent friends.' ... 2. Not existing; lacking; as, the part was rudimental or absent. ... 3. Inattentive to what is passing; absent-minded; preoccupied; as, an absent air. 'What is commonly called an absent man is commonly either a very weak or a very affected man.' (Chesterf …

absent distal clavicle
<radiology> Cleidocranial dysostosis, rheumatoid arthritis, hyperparathyroidism ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

absent nasal septum
<radiology> Cocaine, Wegener's (midline lethal granuloma), surgery, trauma, syphilis, sarcoid ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

absent state
Synonym for dreamy state ... The semiconscious state associated with an epileptic attack. ... Synonym: absent state. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absenteeism
Chronic absence from work or other duty. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

Absidia
A genus of fungi (family Mucoraceae) commonly found in nature. Thermophilic species survive in compost piles at temperatures exceeding 45°C and may cause zygomycosis in humans. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absinthate
<chemistry> A combination of absinthic acid with a base or positive radical. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

absinthe
1. The plant absinthium or common wormwood. ... 2. A strong spirituous liqueur made from wormwood and brandy or alcohol. ... Origin: F. Absinthe. See Absinthium. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

absinthial
Of or pertaining to wormwood; absinthian. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

absinthian
Of the nature of wormwood. 'Absinthian bitterness.' ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

absinthiate
To impregnate with wormwood. ... Origin: From L. Absinthium: cf. L. Absinthiatus, a. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

absinthiated
Impregnated with wormwood; as, absinthiated wine. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

absinthic
<chemistry> Relating to the common wormwood or to an acid obtained from it. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

absinthin
<chemistry> The bitter principle of wormwood (Artemisia absinthium). ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

absinthism
<psychiatry> A nervous and mental disorder resulting from the excessive use of the liqueur, absinthe. ... (27 Sep 1997) ...

absinthium
<botany> The common wormwood (Artemisia absinthium), an intensely bitter plant, used as a tonic and for making the oil of wormwood. ... Origin: L, from Gr. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

absinthol
Synonym for thujone ... C10H16O;the chief constituent of cedar leaf oil; a stimulant similar to camphor. ... Synonym: absinthol, tanacetol, tanacetone, thujol, thuyol, thuyone. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absolute
1. Loosed from any limitation or condition; uncontrolled; unrestricted; unconditional; as, absolute authority, monarchy, sovereignty, an absolute promise or command; absolute power; an absolute monarch. ... 2. Complete in itself; perfect; consummate; faultless; as, absolute perfection; absolute beauty. 'So absolute she seems, And in herself complete …

absolute agraphia
Agraphia in which not even unconnected letters can be written. ... Synonym: atactic agraphia, literal agraphia. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absolute alcohol
Water having been removed. ... Synonym: anhydrous alcohol. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absolute CD4 count
The number of helper T-lymphocytes in a cubic millimeter of blood. With HIV, the absolute CD4 count declines as the infection progresses. The absolute CD4 count is frequently used to monitor the extent of immune suppression in persons with HIV. Also called a T4 count. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

absolute configuration
<chemistry> The three-dimensional arrangement of the atoms around the chiral centre of a molecule. ... (09 Oct 1997) ...

absolute dehydration
Actual water deficit as measured by a difference from the normal or from a given water content. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absolute eosinophil count
<haematology, investigation> A measurement (cells per microlitre) of the number of eosinophils in a blood specimen. ... This measurement is useful in the evaluation of autoimmune disease, allergies, eczema, leukaemia, asthma and hay fever. Normal absolute eosinophil counts are less than 350 cells/mcl (microlitre). ... (27 Sep 1997) ...

absolute filter
<apparatus> A fine-pored, steam-sterilisable filter that is used to trap airborne microorganisms. The filter's pores are about 2 micrometres in diameter, smaller than the particles it is designed to remove. ... (06 May 1997) ...

absolute glaucoma
The final stage of blindness in glaucoma. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absolute gravity
<chemistry> The value that denotes the density (specific gravity) at standard conditions (for gases, these conditions are standard atmospheric pressure at zero degrees Celsius). ... (06 May 1997) ...

absolute hemianopia
Hemianopsia in which the affected field is totally insensitive to all visual stimuli. ... Synonym: complete hemianopia. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absolute hyperopia
Manifest hyperopia that cannot be overcome by an effort of accommodation. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absolute instabilities
<physics> A class of plasma instabilities growing exponentially with time at a point in space, in contrast to convective instabilities. ... (09 Oct 1997) ...

absolute intensity threshold acuity
The minimal light that can be seen. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absolute leukocytosis
An actual increase in the total number of leukocytes in the circulating blood, as distinguished from a relative increase (such as that observed in dehydration). ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absolute oils
Essential oils that are obtained by the removal of insoluble compounds from concrete oils. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absolute pressure
Pressure measured with respect to zero pressure. ... Compare: gauge pressure. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absolute refractory period
The period following excitation when no response is possible regardless of the intensity of the stimulus. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absolute risk
<statistics> The excess risk due to exposure to a specific hazard (disease, injury, etc.) ... (15 Jan 1998) ...

absolute scale
An obsolete term for Kelvin scale. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absolute scotoma
A scotoma in which there is no perception of light. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absolute system of units
A system based on absolute units accepted as being fundamental (length, mass, time) and from which other units (force, energy or work, power) are derived; such system's in common use are the foot-pound-second, centimeter-gram-second, and meter-kilogram-second system's. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absolute temperature
Temperature reckoned in Kelvins from absolute zero. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absolute terminal innervation ratio
The number of motor endplates divided by the number of terminal axons related to them. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absolute threshold
The lowest limit of any perception whatever. ... Compare: differential threshold. ... Synonym: stimulus threshold. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absolute unit
A unit whose value is constant regardless of place or time and not derived from dependent on gravitation. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absolute viscosity
Force per unit area applied tangentially to a fluid, causing unit rate of displacement of parallel planes separated by a unit distance; units in CGS system: poise. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absolute zero
<chemistry, physics> This is the lowest possible temperature (0 Kelvin, -273.15 degrees Celsius, -459.67 degrees Fahrenheit). at this temperature, all molecular motion stops. ... (15 Jan 1998) ...

absolution
1. An absolving, or setting free from guilt, sin, or penalty; forgiveness of an offense. 'Government . . . Granting absolution to the nation.' ... 2. An acquittal, or sentence of a judge declaring and accused person innocent. ... 3. The exercise of priestly jurisdiction in the sacrament of penance, by which Catholics believe the sins of the truly pen …

absolutism
1. The state of being absolute; the system or doctrine of the absolute; the principles or practice of absolute or arbitrary government; despotism. 'The element of absolutism and prelacy was controlling.' (Palfrey) ... 2. Doctrine of absolute decrees. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

absolutist
1. One who is in favor of an absolute or autocratic government. ... 2. <psychology> One who believes that it is possible to realize a cognition or concept of the absolute. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

absorb
<chemistry> To take up liquid or other matter. ... See: absorption. ... (15 Jan 1998) ...

absorbable gelatin film
A sterile, nonantigenic, absorbable, water-insoluble, thin sheet of gelatin prepared by drying a gelatin-formaldehyde solution on plates; used in the closure and repair of defects in membranes such as the dura mater or the pleura; it undergoes absorption over a period of 1 to 6 months. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absorbable gelatin sponge
A sterile, absorbable, water-insoluble gelatin base sponge, used to control capillary bleeding in surgical operations; it is left in situ and is absorbed in from 4 to 6 weeks. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absorbable surgical suture
A surgical suture material prepared from a substance that can be digested by body tissues and is therefore not permanent; it is available in various diameters and tensile strengths, and can be treated to modify its resistance to absorption and be impregnated with antimicrobial agents. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absorbance
1. <chemistry, investigation> Absorbance is defined as a logarithmic function of the percent transmission of a wavelength of light through a liquid. ... 2. <microbiology> This can be used as a measure of the amount of light absorbed by a suspension of bacterial cells or a solution of an organic molecule, it is measured by a colourimeter …

absorbancy
Synonym for absorbance ... 1. <chemistry, investigation> Absorbance is defined as a logarithmic function of the percent transmission of a wavelength of light through a liquid. ... 2. <microbiology> This can be used as a measure of the amount of light absorbed by a suspension of bacterial cells or a solution of an organic molecule, it is m …

absorbancy index
Synonym for specific absorption coefficient ... Absorbance (of light) per unit path length (usually the centimeter) and per unit of mass concentration. ... Compare: molar absorption coefficient. ... Synonym: absorbancy index, absorptivity, extinction coefficient, specific extinction. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absorbed dose
The amount of energy absorbed per unit mass of irradiated material at the target site; in radiation therapy, the former unit for absorbed dose is the rad; the current (S.I.) unit is the gray. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absorbefacient
1. Causing absorption. ... 2. Any substance possessing such quality. ... Origin: L. Ab-sorbeo, to suck in, + facio, to make ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absorbency
Synonym for absorbance ... 1. <chemistry, investigation> Absorbance is defined as a logarithmic function of the percent transmission of a wavelength of light through a liquid. ... 2. <microbiology> This can be used as a measure of the amount of light absorbed by a suspension of bacterial cells or a solution of an organic molecule, it is m …

absorbent
1. Anything which absorbs. 'The ocean, itself a bad absorbent of heat.' (Darwin) ... 2. <medicine> Any substance which absorbs and neutralizes acid fluid in the stomach and bowels, as magnesia, chalk, etc.; also a substance e. G, iodine) which acts on the absorbent vessels so as to reduce enlarged and indurated parts. ... 3. <physiology> …

absorbent cotton
Cotton from which all fatty matter has been extracted, so that it readily takes up fluids. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absorbent points
Cones of paper or paper products used for drying or maintaining medicaments during root canal therapy. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absorbent system
Synonym for lymphatic system ... <anatomy> The tissues and organs (including the bone marrow, spleen, thymus and lymph nodes) that produce and store cells that fight infection and the network of vessels that carry lymph. ... (12 May 1997) ...

absorbent vessels
Synonym for lymph vessels ... The vessels that convey the lymph; they anastomose freely with each other. ... Synonym: vasa lymphatica, absorbent vessels, lymphatic vessels, lymphatics. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absorber head
Portion of a rebreathing anaesthesia circuit that contains carbon dioxide absorbent; often referred to as a canister. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absorbing
Swallowing, engrossing; as, an absorbing pursuit. Absorb'ing. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

absorptiometry, photon
A noninvasive method for quantitating bone mineral content. It is used especially in the diagnosis of osteoporosis and also in measuring bone mineralization in infants. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

absorption
The process of absorbing, specifically: ... 1. <physiology> The movement and uptake of substances (liquids and solutes) into cells or across tissues such as skin, intestine and kiidney tubules, by way of diffusion or osmosis. ... 2. <chemistry> The drawing of a gas or liquid into the pores of a permeable solid. ... 3. <psychology> Th …

absorption band
The range of wavelengths or frequencies in the electromagnetic spectrum where radiant energy is absorbed by passage through a gaseous, liquid, or dissolved substance; it is exploited for analytical purposes in colourimetry or spectrophotometry, and is usually described in terms of the wavelength where maximum absorbance occurs (i.e., lambdamax). …

absorption cell
A small glass chamber with parallel sides, in which absorption spectra of solutions can be obtained. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absorption chromatography
Synonym for chromatography ... <investigation> Techniques for separating molecules based on differential absorption and elution. Term for separation methods involving flow of a fluid carrier over a nonmobile absorbing phase. ... (18 Nov 1997) ...

absorption coefficient
<physics> Measures the degree of wave absorption defined as the fraction of wave energy lost as the wave travels a unit distance. ... See: absorption. ... (15 Jan 1998) ...

absorption collapse
Pulmonary collapse due to rapid complete obstruction of a large bronchus. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absorption fever
An elevation of temperature often occurring, without other untoward symptoms, shortly after childbirth, assumed to be due to absorption of uterine discharges through abrasions of the vaginal wall. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absorption lines
The dark line's in the solar spectrum due to absorption by the solar and the earth's atmosphere; the phenomenon occurs because rays passing from an incandescent body through a colder medium are absorbed by elements in that medium. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absorption spectroscopy
<investigation> This is the use of a spectrophotometer to measure the ability of particles (solutes) in a solution to absorb light through a range of specific wavelengths. ... Every compound absorbs light differently, so absorption spectra can be used to identify compounds, measure concentrations, and determine reaction rates. ... (15 Jan 1998) …

absorption spectrum
<chemistry> A graph of the amount of light a substance absorbs, plotted as a fuction of energy, frequency or wavelength. ... (15 Jan 1998) ...

absorptive
Synonym for absorbent ... 1. Anything which absorbs. 'The ocean, itself a bad absorbent of heat.' (Darwin) ... 2. <medicine> Any substance which absorbs and neutralizes acid fluid in the stomach and bowels, as magnesia, chalk, etc.; also a substance e. G, iodine) which acts on the absorbent vessels so as to reduce enlarged and indurated parts.< …

absorptive cells of intestine
Cell's on the surface of villi of the small intestine and the luminal surface of the large intestine that are characterised by having microvilli on their free surface. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absorptivity
Synonym: specific absorption coefficient, molar absorption coefficient. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abstinence
<psychology> Self-denial, a voluntary refraining from the use of or indulgence in food, stimulants or sexual intercourse. ... (15 Jan 1998) ...

abstinence symptoms
Synonym for withdrawal symptoms ... A group of morbid symptom's, predominantly erethistic, occurring in an addict who is deprived of his accustomed dose of the addicting agent. ... Synonym: abstinence symptoms. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abstinence syndrome
<syndrome> A constellation of physiologic changes undergone by persons or animals who have become physically dependent on a drug or chemical due to prolonged use at elevated doses, but who are abruptly deprived of that substance. The abstinence syndrome varies with the drug to which dependence has developed. Generally the effects observed are …

abstract
1. Withdraw; separate. 'The more abstract . . . We are from the body.' (Norris) ... 2. Considered apart from any application to a particular object; separated from matter; exiting in the mind only; as, abstract truth, abstract numbers. Hence: ideal; abstruse; difficult. ... 3. <logic> Expressing a particular property of an object viewed apart f …

abstract intelligence
The capacity to understand and manage abstract ideas and symbols. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abstracting and indexing
Shortening or summarizing of documents; assigning of descriptors for referencing documents. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abstraction
1. The act of abstracting, separating, or withdrawing, or the state of being withdrawn; withdrawal. 'A wrongful abstraction of wealth from certain members of the community.' (J. S. Mill) ... 2. <psychology> The act process of leaving out of consideration one or more properties of a complex object so as to attend to others; analysis. Thus, when …

abstractitious
Obtained from plants by distillation. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

abstriction
In fungi, the formation of asexual spores by cutting off portions of the sporophore through the growth of dividing partitions. ... Origin: L. Ab-, from, + strictura, a contraction ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

absurd
Contrary to reason or propriety; obviously and fiatly opposed to manifest truth; inconsistent with the plain dictates of common sense; logically contradictory; nonsensical; ridiculous; as, an absurd person, an absurd opinion; an absurd dream. 'This proffer is absurd and reasonless.' (Shak) ''This phrase absurd to call a villain great.' (Pope) (p. 9 …

abterminal
In a direction away from the end and toward the centre; denoting the course of an electrical current in a muscle. ... Origin: L. Ab, from, + terminus, end ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abtropfung
A theory that nevus cells are epidermal cells (melanocytes) that proliferate and drop off (migrate) into the dermis. ... Origin: Ger. Abtropfung, trickling down ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abulia
1. Loss or impairment of the ability to perform voluntary actions or to make decisions. ... 2. Reduction in speech, movement, thought, and emotional reaction; a common result of bilateral frontal lobe disease. ... Synonym: aboulia. ... Origin: G. A-priv. + boule, will ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abulic
Relating to, or suffering from, abulia. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...