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mondofacto - Online Medical Dictionary
Category: Health and Medicine > Medical Dictionary
Date & country: 26/01/2008, UK
Words: 138795


ABMT
Synonym for autologous bone marrow transplant ... <haematology, procedure> A process in which a patients healthy bone marrow is withdrawn and preserved. ... It is later injected back into the patient to replace bone marrow damaged by high doses of radiation therapy. It can then produce healthy blood cells. This treatment is used to offset the d …

abnerval
Away from a nerve; denoting specifically a current of electricity passing through a muscular fibre in a direction away from the point of entrance of the nerve fibre. ... Synonym: abneural. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abneural
Away from the neural axis. ... Origin: L. Ab, away from, + G. Neuron, nerve ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abnodation
The act of cutting away the knots of trees. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

abnormal
Not normal, contrary to the usual structure, position, behaviour or rule. ... (06 Oct 1997) ...

abnormal cleavage of cardiac valve
Congenital malformation of a valve leaflet with a defect extending from the free margin. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abnormal correspondence
Synonym for anomalous correspondence ... Abnormal correspondence, a condition, frequent in strabismus, in which corresponding retinal points do not have the same visual direction; the fovea of one eye corresponds to an extrafoveal area of the fellow eye. ... Synonym: abnormal correspondence. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abnormal heart chamber dimensions
<radiology> Left ventricular volume overload, left ventricular hypertrophy, right ventricular volume overload, right ventricular hypertrophy, fixed subvalvular aortic stenosis, hypoplastic left/right ventricle; common ventricle, congestive cardiomyopathy ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abnormal occlusion
An arrangement of the teeth which is not considered to be within the normal range of variation. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abnormal placental size
<radiology> TOO BIG (greater than5cm in sections obtained at right angles to the long axis), maternal disease, diabetic mothers (= villous oedema), intrauterine infections, anaemic mothers (= normal histology), foetal disease, erythroblatosis foetalis (= villous oedema and hyperplasia), umbilical vein obstruction, foetal high output failure, …

abnormalities
Congenital malformations of organs or parts. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abnormalities, drug-induced
Congenital abnormalities caused by medicinal substances or drugs of abuse given to or taken by the mother, or to which she is inadvertently exposed during the manufacture of such substances. The concept excludes abnormalities resulting from exposure to non-medicinal chemicals in the environment. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abnormalities, radiation-induced
Congenital changes in the morphology of organs produced by exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abnormality
1. The state or quality of being abnormal. ... 2. An anomaly, deformity, malformation, impairment, or dysfunction. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

ABO antigens
<haematology, immunology> A system of genetically determined antigens (proteins) located on the surface of the erythrocyte. ... The presence of these specific antigens gives a blood its unique properties. Because of the antigen differences existing between individuals, blood groups are significant in blood transfusions, maternal-foetal incompa …

ABO blood group
<haematology> The major human blood type system which describes the oligosaccharide glycoprotein antigens found on the surface of human blood cells. ... According to the type of antigen present, a person may be assigned a blood type of A, B, AB or O. A second type of antigen, the Rh factor, renders a positive or negative blood type. The ABO bl …

ABO incompatibility
<haematology> A type of blood incompatibility, found rarely. Transfusion reactions may occur as a result of such incompatibility. ... (27 Sep 1997) ...

abohm
Electromagnetic unit of resistance equal to 10-9 ohm. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

aboiement
Rarely used term for the involuntary production of abnormal sounds, as seen in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. ... Origin: Fr. Barking, yelping ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abolish
1. To do away with wholly; to annul; to make void; said of laws, customs, institutions, governments, etc.; as, to abolish slavery, to abolish folly. ... 2. To put an end to, or destroy, as a physical objects; to wipe out. 'And with thy blood abolish so reproachful blot.' (Spenser) 'His quick instinctive hand Caught at the hilt, as to abolish him.' ( …

aboma
<zoology> A large South American serpent (Boa aboma). ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

abomasitis
Inflammation of the abomasum. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abomasum
<anatomy> The fourth stomach of the cow. The abomasums of suckling calves are used as a source of rennet, a rennin-containing commercial enzyme preparation used to make cheese. ... (06 May 1997) ...

abomasus
<anatomy> The fourth or digestive stomach of a ruminant, which leads from the third stomach omasum. See Ruminantia. ... Origin: NL, fr. L. Ab + omasum (a Celtic word). ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

aborad
In a direction away from the mouth; opposite of orad. ... Origin: L. Ab, from, + os (or-), mouth ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

aboral
<zoology> Situated opposite to, or away from, the mouth. ... Origin: L. Ab. + E. Oral. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

aboriginal
1. An original inhabitant of any land; one of the aborigines. ... 2. An animal or a plant native to the region. 'It may well be doubted whether this frog is an aboriginal of these islands.' (Darwin) ... 1. First; original; indigenous; primitive; native; as, the aboriginal tribes of America. 'Mantled o'er with aboriginal turf.' ... 2. Of or pertaining …

aborigines
1. The earliest known inhabitants or indigenous individuals of a country; native races. ... 2. The original fauna and flora of a geographical area ... Origin: L. Aborigines; ab + origo, especially the first inhabitants of Latium, those who originally (ab origine) inhabited Latium or Italy. See Origin. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998)
abort
1. To miscarry; to bring forth young prematurely. ... 2. <biology> To become checked in normal development, so as either to remain rudimentary or shrink away wholly; to become sterile. ... Origin: L. Abortare, fr. Abortus, p. P. Of aboriri; ab + oriri to rise, to be born. See Orient. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

aborted
1. Brought forth prematurely. ... 2. <biology> Rendered abortive or sterile; undeveloped; checked in normal development at a very early stage; as, spines are aborted branches. 'The eyes of the cirripeds are more or less aborted in their mature state.' (Owen) ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

aborted ectopic pregnancy
Synonym for tubal abortion ... The rupture of an oviduct, the seat of ectopic pregnancy, or extrusion of the product of conception through the fimbriated end of the oviduct; aborted ectopic pregnancy, the pregnancy having originated in the fallopian tubes. ... Synonym: aborted ectopic pregnancy. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

aborticide
<medicine> The act of destroying a foetus in the womb; feticide. ... Origin: L. Abortus + caedere to kill. See Abort. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

abortient
Synonym for abortifacient ... <pharmacology> A drug or compound that induces the expulsion of an embryo or foetus. ... (06 May 1997) ...

abortifacient
<pharmacology> A drug or compound that induces the expulsion of an embryo or foetus. ... (06 May 1997) ...

abortifacient agents
Chemical substances that interrupt pregnancy after implantation. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abortifacient agents, non-steroidal
Non-steroidal chemical compounds with abortifacient activity. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abortifacient agents, steroidal
Steroidal compounds with abortifacient activity. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abortigenic
Synonym: abortifacient. ... Origin: L. Abortus, abortion, + genesis, production ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abortion
1. <obstetrics> The premature expulsion from the uterus of the products of conception of the embryo or of a nonviable foetus. The four classic symptoms, usually present in each type of abortion, are uterine contractions, uterine haemorrhage, softening and dilatation of the cervix and presentation or expulsion of all or part of the products of …

abortion applicants
Individuals requesting induced abortions. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abortion rate
The number of abortions per 1000 terminated pregnancies during a given period of time. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abortion, criminal
Illegal termination of pregnancy. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abortion, eugenic
Abortion performed because of possible foetal defects. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abortion, habitual
The miscarriage of 3 or more consecutive pregnancies. Recurrent abortion can be identically defined as 3 or more miscarriages (spontaneous abortions) with no intervening pregnancies. Habitual or recurrent abortion is a form of infertility. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abortion, incomplete
Abortion in which not all the products of conception have been expelled. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abortion, induced
Intentional removal of a foetus from the uterus by any of a number of techniques. (popline, 1978) ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abortion, legal
Termination of pregnancy under conditions allowed under local laws. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abortion, missed
The retention in the uterus of a dead foetus two months or more after its death. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abortion, multiple
Couples who have had 2 or more miscarriages (spontaneous abortions) have about a 5% chance that one member of the couple is carrying a chromsome translocation responsible for the miscarriages. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abortion, recurrent
See Abortion, habitual. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abortion, septic
Infected abortion in which there is dissemination of microorganisms and their products into the maternal systemic circulation. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abortion, therapeutic
Abortion induced to save the life or health of a pregnant woman. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abortion, threatened
Condition of vaginal bleeding with or without pain in early pregnancy which may presage an abortion. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abortion, veterinary
Premature expulsion of the foetus in animals. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abortionist
One who interrupts a pregnancy. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abortive
1. Produced by abortion; born prematurely; as, an abortive child. ... 2. Made from the skin of a still-born animal; as, abortive vellum. ... 3. Rendering fruitless or ineffectual. 'Plunged in that abortive gulf.' ... 4. Coming to naught; failing in its effect; miscarrying; fruitless; unsuccessful; as, an abortive attempt. 'An abortive enterprise.' ... …

abortive neurofibromatosis
incomplete neurofibromatosis ...

abortive transduction
Transduction in which the genetic fragment from the donor bacterium is not integrated in the genome of the recipient bacterium, and, when the latter divides, is transmitted to only one of the daughter cells. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abortively
In an abortive or untimely manner; immaturely; fruitlessly. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

abortus
Any product (or all products) of an abortion. ... Origin: L. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abortus bacillus
Synonym for brucella abortus ... A species of the genus brucella whose natural hosts are cattle and other bovidae. Other mammals, including man, may be infected. Abortion and placentitis are frequently produced in the pregnant animal. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

aboulia
Synonym for abulia ... 1. Loss or impairment of the ability to perform voluntary actions or to make decisions. ... 2. Reduction in speech, movement, thought, and emotional reaction; a common result of bilateral frontal lobe disease. ... Synonym: aboulia. ... Origin: G. A-priv. + boule, will ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

ABP
<abbreviation> Androgen binding protein. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

ABPA
<abbreviation> Allergic bronchopulmonry aspergillosis. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

ABR
<abbreviation> Auditory brainstem response. ... See: auditory brainstem response audiometry. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abrachia
Congenital absence of arms. ... See: amelia. ... Origin: G. A-priv. + brachion, arm ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abrachiocephalia
Synonym for abrachiocephaly ... Congenital absence of arms and head. ... Synonym: acephalobrachia. ... Origin: G. A-priv. + brachion, arm, + kephale, head ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abrachiocephaly
Congenital absence of arms and head. ... Synonym: acephalobrachia. ... Origin: G. A-priv. + brachion, arm, + kephale, head ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abrade
1. To wear away by mechanical action. ... 2. To scrape away the surface layer from a part. ... Origin: L. Ab-rado, pp. -rasus, to scrape off ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abraded wound
Synonym for abrasion ... 1. <pathology> The wearing away of a substance or structure (such as the skin or the teeth) through some unusual or abnormal mechanical process. ... 2. <clinical sign> A superficial injury to the skin or other body tissue caused by rubbing or scraping resulting in an area of body surface denuded of skin or mucous …

Abrahams, Robert
<person> U.S. Physician, 1861-1935. ... See: Abrahams' sign. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

Abrahams' sign
<clinical sign> An obsolete sign: ... Rales and other adventitious sounds, changes in the respiratory murmurs, and increase in the whispered sound can be heard on auscultation over the acromial end of the clavicle some time before they become audible at the apex; heard primarily in pulmonary tuberculosis affecting the apical portion of the lun …

abram-man
One of a set of vagabonds who formerly roamed through England, feigning lunacy for the sake of obtaining alms. To sham Abraham, to feign sickness. ... Origin: Possibly in allusion to the parable of the beggar Lazarus in Luke xvi. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

Abrams, Albert
<person> U.S. Physician, 1863-1924. ... See: Abrams' heart reflex. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

Abrams' heart reflex
A contraction of the myocardium when the skin of the precordial region is irritated. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abranchial
<zoology> Abranchiate. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

abranchiata
<zoology> A group of annelids, so called because the species composing it have no special organs of respiration. ... Origin: NL, from Gr. Priv. +, pl, the gills of fishes. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

abranchiate
<zoology> Without gills. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

abrasion
1. <pathology> The wearing away of a substance or structure (such as the skin or the teeth) through some unusual or abnormal mechanical process. ... 2. <clinical sign> A superficial injury to the skin or other body tissue caused by rubbing or scraping resulting in an area of body surface denuded of skin or mucous membrane. ... (11 Nov 199 …

abrasive
1. Causing abrasion. ... 2. Any material used to produce abrasions. ... 3. A substance used in dentistry for abrading, grinding, or polishing. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abrasive media
<microscopy> Extremely hard materials (Diamond, SiC, Al2O3 etc.), usually in a very fine particulate form (less than 15 micrometres), used in the initial stages of specimen preparation to grind and polish samples to the desired thickness or finish. ... (05 Aug 1998) ...

abrasive strip
A ribbon-like piece of linen on one side of which is bonded abrasive particles; used in dentistry for contouring and polishing proximal surfaces of restorations. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abrasiveness
1. That property of a substance which causes surface wear by friction. ... 2. The quality of being able to scratch or wear away another material. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abreact
1. To show strong emotion while reliving a previous traumatic experience. ... 2. To discharge or release repressed emotion. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abreaction
A process in psychotherapy in which the patient is 'desensitised' to emotionally painful, often forgotten (repressed) memories by recalling and reacting to them in the 'safety' of the treatment setting. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abrin
<pharmacology> A highly poisonous protein found in the seeds of Abrus precatorius, the rosary pea. Abrin is toxic because it inhibits protein synthesis, causing symptoms such as internal bleeding, intestinal upset and the irritation of mucous membranes. It was formerly used to treat some chronic eye disorders and it is currently being researc …

abroad
1. at large; widely; broadly; over a wide space; as, a tree spreads its branches abroad. 'The fox roams far abroad.' (Prior) ... 2. Without a certain confine; outside the house; away from one's abode; as, to walk abroad. 'I went to St. James', where another was preaching in the court abroad.' (Evelyn) ... 3. Beyond the bounds of a country; in foreign …

abrupt
Sudden and unexpected. ... (18 Nov 1997) ...

abrupt cessation
<pharmacology> Refers to after suddenly stopping the medication. ... (06 Oct 1997) ...

abruptio placentae
<obstetrics> This is the premature separation of the placenta, i.e. Separation of the placenta from the site of implantation on the uterus before the delivery of the foetus. It is a life threatening condition for the foetus and occurs about 1 in 500 to 750 deliveries. ... (09 Oct 1997) ...

abruption
A tearing away, separation, or detachment. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abruptly
1. In an abrupt manner; without giving notice, or without the usual forms; suddenly. ... 2. Precipitously. ... <botany> Abruptly pinnate, pinnate without an odd leaflet, or other appendage, at the end. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...

Abrus
A genus of leguminous plants. The root of Abrus precatorius, Indian liquorice, is sometimes used as a substitute for liquorice; the seeds are toxic and may cause vomiting, diarrhoea, convulsions, and death if chewed. ... Origin: more correctly Habrus, from G. Habros, graceful ... (05 Mar 2000) ...

abscess
<microbiology, surgery> A localised collection of pus caused by suppuration buried in tissues, organs or confined spaces. Usually due to an infective process. ... Origin: L. Abscessus, from ab = away, cedere = to go ... (18 Nov 1997) ...

abscess scan
<investigation> This is a nuclear scan that utilises radioactively tagged white blood cells. ... The patients white blood cells (taken from a small tube of blood) are tagged with radioactive indium. Later, the cells are then reinjected into the bloodstream. The coarse of the white blood cells can then be mapped using a gamma camera (radiation …

abscess, peritonsillar
A persistent collection of pus behind the tonsil. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abscess, skin
Medical term for a common boil. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...

abscisic acid
<biochemistry> A lipid hormone that inhibits cell growth in plants, it is associated with fruit drop, leaf death and seed dormancy. It is synthesised in the plastids from carotenoids. This hormone helps plants deal with water loss, and its effects can be reversed with gibberellins. ... (06 May 1997) ...

abscisic acid 8'-hydroxylase
<enzyme> Catalyses conversion of abscisic acid to 8'-hydroxyabscisic acid, which rearranges to phaseic acid ... Registry number: EC 1.14.99.- ... Synonym: aba 8'-hydroxylase ... (26 Jun 1999) ...

abscissa
<geometry> One of the elements of reference by which a point, as of a curve, is referred to a system of fixed rectilineal coordinate axes. ... When referred to two intersecting axes, one of them called the axis of abscissas, or of X, and the other the axis of ordinates, or of Y, the abscissa of the point is the distance cut off from the axis o …