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Smiths - Neuropsychology Glossary
Category: Health and Medicine > Neuropsychology Glossary
Date & country: 14/10/2007, UK
Words: 210


Tumour
A focal growth; a swelling. [See also cancer, benign, and malignant.]

Upper Motor Neuron
See our e-handout on `The Pyramidal and Extrapyramidal Motor Systems`.

Visual Agnosia
An inability to recognise visually presented objects.

Wernicke-Korsakow Syndrome (WKS)
A degenerative condition often resulting from chronic alcoholism.

Wernicke's Aphasia
A fluent aphasia characterised by auditory comprehension loss not accompanied by sensory deafness. First described by Wernicke (1874). There is defective repetition of both words and sentences. Speech can remain fluent but its content becomes paraphasic due to loss of internal correction (ie. the patient does not understand what s/he is saying any more than s/he understands what others are saying). The lesion is classically located in Wernicke's area. [See also Lichtheim's house.]

Wernicke's Area
Usually identified as the first (some prefer the designation superior) temporal convolution of the left hemisphere, and the site of a classic Wernicke's aphasia. Centred on Brodmann's Area 22 [to see where this is on the cortical map, click here, and to see Wernicke's own diagram, click here].

WKS
See Wernicke-Korsakow syndrome.

Word Finding Difficulty
A self-explanatory synonym for anomia (1).

Word Production Anomia
One of the nine clinically distinct subtypes of anomia (1) recognised by Benson (1979). An anomia in which the naming defect is resolvable upon phonemic cueing. [Compare word selection anomia.]

Word Selection Anomia
One of the nine clinically distinct subtypes of anomia (1) recognised by Benson (1979). An anomia in which the naming defect is not resolvable upon cueing. Gnosis is intact (because patients can immediately point to the object in question if told its name), and conversational speech is otherwise fluent and effortless. [Compare word production anomia.]