Copy of `Wolf Source - Lupine glossary`

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Wolf Source - Lupine glossary
Category: Animals and Nature > Wolfs
Date & country: 13/09/2007, USA
Words: 158


Necropsy
Examination of an animal after death; autopsy of an animal.

Nocturnal
Active at night

Nurse
To drink mother`s milk

Nutrient
A nourishing substance.

Olfactory
Pertaining to smell.

Omega
Lowest ranking member in the social order of a wolf pack.

Omnivore
A creature that eats both plants and animals.

Order
A group of related animals or plants.

Pack
The name given to a group of hunting animals such as wild dogs or wolves.

Parasite
Tiny creatures, such as fleas, ticks or mites, that feed on larger animals, sucking their blood.

Pelage
The entire coat of hair or fur, including the soft, furry undercoat as well as the coarse guard hairs, on a mammal.

Pheromones
Chemical secretions from an animal to attract another, or display territory boundaries.

Poaching
Illegal taking of wildlife.

Predation
The act of an animal capturing and eating other animals.

Predator
An animal that hunts and kills other animals.

Prey
An animal hunted by other animals for food.

Pup
Young canines.

Rabies
Disease that affects an animal`s brain and causes the animal to wander and bit at other animals. It is spread by the bite of an infected animal.

Raised-leg Urination (RLU)
Urinating with one hind leg raised.

Range
Geographical area in which an animal can be found.

Recolonization
The natural restoration of a population to an area within its original range.

Recovery
Natural or assisted restoration of a population to specified levels for minimum number of consecutive years to a designated area within its original range.

Regurgitate
Bring up food from the stomach that has not been digested. Some animals regurgitate food for their young, not always because they are sick.

Rehabilitate
To bring back to good condition.

Reintroduction
Act of bringing individuals of a certain species (plant or animal) back into a designated area within the species` original range, but from which it was extirpated or nearly eliminated. The purpose of reintroduction is to establish a new population in the wild.

Rendezvous Site
A place where pack members meet between hunting trips and where the pack moves when the pups are old enough to move out of the den.

Reproduce
To have / create offspring.

Resources
A supply of environmental benefits, like water, or sunlight.

Retractable
Capable of being hidden, as in parts of an animal`s body.

Scat
Fecal matter or feces.

Scent-marking
Act of marking an area with body odor, scent from a gland, or urine or scat. This technique is used by wolves to communicate with other wolves and animals. For example, scent marks tell other wolves the locations of a pack`s boundaries.

Scientific Name
A name, usually from the Latin language, that scientists give to a plant or an animal.

Secondary Hairs
Fine hairs making up the undercoat; also called under hairs.

Social
Preferring the company of other creatures rather than being alone. Animals that are social like to be around each other and usually gather in a group.

Species
Distinct kinds of individual plants or animals that have common traits and share a common name.

Stalk
To follow prey stealthily and quietly.

Submission
Showing weakness or subordinance.

Submit
To let another animal boss or lead. Submissive wolves lower their tails, lay their ears back and roll over on their back around dominant wolves.

Subordinate
A less important, lower ranking member of a group.

Subspecies
A smaller group of plants or animals within a particular species.

Sustainable
Able to be used in a way that does not deplete; renewable.

Symbiosis
A relationship between animals where each gains particular benefits from living close to the other; such animals are said to have a symbiotic relationship.

Territorial
To consider an area of land as your own and to keep strange members of your species out by using warnings or fighting, if needed. Animals such as deer that are not territorial are said to have home ranges. This means that they have certain areas where they live but they don`t defend them.

Territory
The area occupied by a single animals or group of animals, to the exclusion of others of the same species; often defended by aggressive displays.

Threatened
Animals or plants that are in danger of extinction in a part of their range.

Tracks
Footprints, in this case left by the foot of an animal.

Tundra
Flat land in the Arctic where no trees grow.

Underfur
Pale, short fine hairs in the coat that help keep the animal warm. The underfur has an oily substance that makes them water-resistant.

Ungulate
A hoofed mammal, such as deer, elk, mountain goats, bighorn sheep, moose, antelope, caribou and bison.

Urban
Having to do with a town or a city.

Vertebrate
An animal with a backbone.

Viable Population
A self-supporting population with sufficient numbers and genetic variety among healthy individuals and breeding pairs that are well enough distributed to ensure that the species will not become threatened, endangered or extinct in the foreseeable future.

Vulnerable
Capable of being hurt or damaged.

Wean
To stop feeding a pup milk and start feeding it solid foods.

Whelp
To give birth; said of female dogs.

Wolfdog
Common name for wolf hybrid.

Wolfers
Hunters who were hired to kill wolves by people who didn`t want any wolves around.

Yearling
An animal between one and two years old.