vacuum

[n] - the absence of matter 2. [n] - a region empty of matter 3. [n] - an electrical home appliance that cleans by suction 4. [v] - clean with a vacuum cleaner
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=vacuum

Vacuum

A given space filled with gas at pressures below atmospheric pressure. Various approximate ranges are: low vacuum, 101325 to 3000 Pamedium vacuum, 3000 to 0. 133 Pahigh vacuum, 0.133 to 1.333x10-4 Pavery high vacuum, 1.333x10-4 to 1.333224x10-7 Paultrahigh vacuum, 1.333224x10-7 Pa and belowHeat TransferIn
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vacuum

absolute vaccuum. Compare with partial vaccuum. A volume which contains no matter.
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/v.shtml

vacuum

Origin: L, fr. Vacuus empty. See Vacuous. ... 1. <physics> A space entirely devoid of matter (called also, by way of distinction, absolute vacuum); hence, in a more general sense, a space, as the interior of a closed vessel, which has been exhausted to a high or the highest degree by an air pump or other artificial means; as, water boils at a
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vacuum

vacuum cleaner noun an electrical home appliance that cleans by suction
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=vacuum

vacuum

vacuity noun a region that is devoid of matter
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=vacuum

vacuum

noun the absence of matter
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=vacuum

vacuum

(vak´ūm) a space devoid of air or other gas.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Vacuum

• (n.) The condition of rarefaction, or reduction of pressure below that of the atmosphere, in a vessel, as the condenser of a steam engine, which is nearly exhausted of air or steam, etc.; as, a vacuum of 26 inches of mercury, or 13 pounds per square inch. • (n.) A space entirely devoid of matter (called also, by way of distinction, abso
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vacuum

(from the article `vacuum technology`) all processes and physical measurements carried out under conditions of below-normal atmospheric pressure. A process or physical measurement is ... ...ever attempted in the history of science—the attempt to explain the creation of truly everything from literally nothing. In other words, is th...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/v/1

vacuum

The state of negative pressure. A hydraulic pump works by creating a vacuum in the closed hydraulic system.
Found on http://www.toolingu.com/definition-570340-32792-flow-rate.html

vacuum

vacuum (s); vacua, vacuums (pl) ; vacuuming, vacuumed 1. Absence of matter; a space empty of matter or relatively empty of matter. 2. A space in which the pressure is significantly lower than atmospheric pressure. 3. A state of emptiness; a void. 4. A state of being sealed off from external or environmental influences; isolation. 5. Rel...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2258/3

Vacuum

Pressures below 1 atmosphere. Units are; inches of mercury ('Hg), millimeters (mm Hg), microns (mHg), and generally 10-N (millimeters of mercury). see Insulating Vacuum
Found on http://www-bdnew.fnal.gov/operations/accgloss/gloss.html

Vacuum

[disambiguation] Vacuum is the absence of matter. Vacuum may also refer to: ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vacuum_(disambiguation)

Vacuum

[band] Vacuum is the name of a Swedish pop band. The members are Mattias Lindblom and Anders Wollbeck. They also work as song writers and producers under the same name. As songwriters and producers Wollbeck/Lindblom have worked with artists such as Tarja Turunen, Garou, Monrose, Keisha Buchanan, f(x) and The Canadian Tenors. Wollbeck/Lindbl
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vacuum_(band)

Vacuum

Vacuum is space that is empty of matter. The word stems from the Latin adjective vacuus for "empty". An approximation to such vacuum is a region with a gaseous pressure much less than atmospheric pressure. Physicists often discuss ideal test results that would occur in a perfect vacuum, which they sometimes simply call "vacuum" or free space, ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vacuum

vacuum

  1. the absence of matter
  2. a region empty of matter
  3. an electrical home appliance that cleans by suction

Found on

Vacuum

Any pressure less than atmospheric. Can present a problem for the elastomer in many seal applications.
Found on http://www.mcnallyinstitute.com/Charts/Glossary-html/Glossary_V.html

Vacuum

Pressures below 1 atmosphere. Units are; inches of mercury ('Hg), millimeters (mm Hg), microns (mHg), and generally 10-N (millimeters of mercury). see Insulating Vacuum
Found on http://www-bdnew.fnal.gov/operations/accgloss/gloss.html#A

Vacuum

refers to a volume of space that has little or no pressure due to the absence of air or any other gasses; there are differing degrees of vacuum, which is why Empire Magnetics offers three different grades of vacuum rated motors and related products.
Found on http://www.empiremagnetics.com/glossary/glossary.htm#A

Vacuum

Dictionary: Empty space, devoid of matter.
Found on http://www.amgas.com/gloss.htm

vacuum

In the simplest sense, empty space. However, since a vacuum, either natural or artificial, is never completely empty, the term needs a modifier. Thus scientists speak of a hard vacuum, quantum vacuum, and so forth. See also Casimir effect, vacuum energy drive, and zero point energy.
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/V/vacuum.html

vacuum

vacuum, theoretically, space without matter in it. A perfect vacuum has never been obtained; the best man-made vacuums contain less than 100,000 gas molecules per cc, compared to about 30 billion billion (30×1018) molecules for air at sea level. The most nearly perfect vacuum exists in intergal...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0850304.html

Vacuum

A vacuum is a space from which the gas has been removed. In fact it is impossible to obtain a perfect vacuum as any material surrounding a vacuum will have a vapour pressure and will thus release particles into the vacuum. In general use the term refers to gases at very low pressures such as exist at the limit of the earth' s atmosphere. The neares
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/GV.HTM

vacuum

Type: Term Pronunciation: vak′yūm Definitions: 1. An empty space, one practically exhausted of air or gas.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=96480
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