Theory

[mathematical logic] === Subtheories and extensions === A theory S is a subtheory of a theory T if S is a subset of T. If T is a subset of S then S is an extension or supertheory of T === Consistency and completeness === A syntactically consistent theory is a theory from which not every sentence in the underlying language can be proved (wit
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_(mathematical_logic)

Theory

This is a word that is frequently misunderstood. Let us say we have a collection of observations ('facts') about something - it preferentially absorbs certain wavelengths of light, is composed largely of oxygen, hydrogen, carbon, calcium and phosphorus in certain proportions, and absorbs oxygen from the environment while releasing carbon dioxide. A
Found on http://www.kcpc.usyd.edu.au/discovery/glossary-all.html

theory

[Noun] A belief or an idea used by scientists to explain something.
Example: Isaac Newton discovered the theory of gravity after watching an apple fall to the ground.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

Theory

An attempt to identify general properties that explain regularly observed events. Theories form an essential element of all sociological works. While theories tend to be linked to broader theoretical approaches, they are also strongly influenced by the research results they help generate.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20212

theory

[n] - a well-substantiated explanation of some aspect of the natural world 2. [n] - a belief that can guide behavior
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=theory

Theory

a statement of how and why specific facts are related
Found on http://wps.pearsoned.co.uk/wps/media/objects/2143/2195136/glossary/glossary

theory

theories. Compare with hypothesis. Theories are well-established explanations for experimental data. To become established, the theory must experimentally tested by many different investigators. Theories usually can not be proven; a single contrary experiment can disprove a theory.
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/t.shtml

Theory

A principle that explains a body of facts and the laws based on them.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/1588-Theory

Theory

In its most general sense a theory describes or explains something. Often it is the answer to 'what', 'when', 'how' or 'why' questions
Found on http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/information/glossary/

Theory

The'o·ry noun ; plural Theories . [ French théorie , Latin theoria , Greek ... a beholding, spectacle, contemplation, speculation, from ... a spectator, ... to see, view. See Theater .] 1. A doctrine, or scheme of things, which terminates in speculation or
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/41

theory

In science, an explanation for some phenomenon which is based on observation, experimentation, and reasoning. In popular use, a theory is often assumed to imply mere speculation, but in science, something is not called a theory until it has been confirmed over the course of many independent experiments. Theories are more certain than hypotheses, bu
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?theory

theory

noun a well-substantiated explanation of some aspect of the natural world; an organized system of accepted knowledge that applies in a variety of circumstances to explain a specific set of phenomena; `theories can incorporate facts and laws and tested hypothes
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=theory

theory

(the´ә-re) (thēr´e) the doctrine or the principles underlying an art as distinguished from the practice of that particular art. a formulated hypothesis or, loosely speaking, any hypothesis or opinion not based upon actual knowledge.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Theory

• (n.) The science, as distinguished from the art; as, the theory and practice of medicine. • (n.) A doctrine, or scheme of things, which terminates in speculation or contemplation, without a view to practice; hypothesis; speculation. • (n.) An exposition of the general or abstract principles of any science; as, the theory of music.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/theory/

theory

theory 1. Originally, a mental viewing; contemplation. 2. A speculative idea or plan as to how something might be done. 3. A formulation of apparent relationships or underlying principles of certain observed phenomena which have been verified to some degree. 4. That branch of an art or science consisting in a knowledge of its principles and methods
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2136/

Theory

The English word theory was derived from a technical term in Ancient Greek philosophy. The word theoria, θεωρία, meant "a looking at, viewing, beholding", and referring to contemplation or speculation, as opposed to action. Theory is especially often contrasted to "practice" (from Greek praxis, πρᾶξις) a Greek term for "doing", ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory

Theory

Proposed explanation for the causal mechanisms responsible for a phenomenon or a set of facts. Also see hypothesis.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/t.html

Theory

An organized system of ideas that seeks to explain why two or more events are related.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21198

theory

theory, in music, discipline involving the construction of cognitive systems to be used as a tool for comprehending musical compositions. The discipline is subdivided into what can be called speculative and analytic theory. Speculative theory engages in reconciling with music certain philosophical o...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0848422.html

Theory

(Gr. theoria, viewing) The hypothetical universal aspect of anything. For Plato, a contemplated truth. For Aristotle, pure knowledge as opposed to the practical. An abstraction from practice. The principle from which practice proceeds. Opposite of practice. -- J.K.F. Hypothesis. More loosely: supposition, whatever is problematic, verifiable but n..
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/t.html

theory

Type: Term Pronunciation: thē′ŏ-rē Definitions: 1. A reasoned explanation of known facts or phenomena that serves as a basis of investigation by which to seek the truth.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=91206

theory

In science, a set of ideas, concepts, principles, or methods used to explain a wide set of observed facts. Among the major theories of science are relativity, quantum theory, evolution, and plate tectonics
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0025292.html

theory

(Gk: theoros spectator) a supposition or system of ideas explaining something, especially one based on general principles independent of the particular things to be explained. Scientific theory is derived from observations, and it is able to predict other outcomes. A (minimal but adequate) set of rules explaining the general. A theory allows one to
Found on http://www.seafriends.org.nz/books/glossary.htm

theory

A hypothesis that has withstood extensive testing by a variety of methods, and in which a higher degree of certainty may be placed. A theory is NEVER a fact, but instead is an attempt to explain one or more facts.
Found on http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/biobk/biobookglosst.html

theory

a hypothesis assumed for the sake of argument or investigation
Found on http://www.ircpolitics.org/glossary.html
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