Thenardite

The·nard'ite noun [ Named after the French chemist, Latin J. Thénard .] (Min.) Anhydrous sodium sulphate, a mineral of a white or brown color and vitreous luster.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/39

thenardite

<chemical> Anhydrous sodium sulphate, a mineral of a white or brown colour and vitreous luster. ... Origin: Named after the French chemist, L.J.Thenard. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?thenardite

Thenardite

• (n.) Anhydrous sodium sulphate, a mineral of a white or brown color and vitreous luster.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/thenardite/

thenardite

any of a type of sodium sulfate mineral (Na2SO4) that has been deposited as an evaporation product near salt lakes and playas, as in the arid ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/34

thenardite

thenardite: see sodium sulfate.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0919511.html

Thenardite

Thenardite, named after the French chemist, Louis-Jacques Thenard, is a white or brown coloured mineral with a vitreous lustre that dissolves easily in water and has a weak salty taste. It forms in sedimentary evaporate deposits in lakes and the playas of desert climates. Thenardite was confirmed as a distinct species of mineral in 1826 and is used...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/HT.HTM

Thenardite

Thenardite is an anhydrous sodium sulfate mineral, Na2SO4 which occurs in arid evaporite environments. It also occurs in dry caves and old mine workings as an efflorescence and as a crusty sublimate deposit around fumaroles. It occurs in volcanic caves on Mt. Etna, Italy. It was first described in 1825 for an occurrence in the Espartinas Saltworks...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thenardite
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