Talmud

[n] - sacred writings of Orthodox Judaism
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=Talmud

Talmud

The two most important works of post-biblical Jewish literature. The Babylonian (Bavli) Talmud, compiled around AD 600, and the Jerusalem (Yerushalmi) Talmud, compiled around AD 500, provide a...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Talmud

Tal'mud noun [ Chald. talmūd instruction, doctrine, from lamad to learn, limmad to teach.] The body of the Jewish civil and canonical law not comprised in the Pentateuch. » The Talmud consists of two parts, the Mishna , or text, and the Gemara , ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/7

Talmud

noun the collection of ancient rabbinic writings on Jewish law and tradition (the Mishna and the Gemara) that constitute the basis of religious authority in Orthodox Judaism
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=Talmud

Talmud

• (n.) The body of the Jewish civil and canonical law not comprised in the Pentateuch.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/talmud/

Talmud

Talmud (tăl'mud) [Aramaic from Heb.,=learning], in Judaism, vast compilation of the Oral Law with rabbinical elucidations, elaborations, and commentaries, in contradistinction to the Scriptures or Written Laws. The Talmud is the accepted authority for Orthodox Jews everywhere. Its two divi...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0847727.html

Talmud

(Learning) An encyclopedic work in Hebrew-Aramaic produced during 800 years (300 B.C.-500 A.D.) in Palestine and Babylon. Its six sedarim (orders) subdivided in 63 massektot (tractates) represent the oral tradition of Judaism expounding and developing the religious ideas and civil laws of the written special hermeneutic middot (measures) of law (i....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/t.html

Talmud

The Talmud is the collection of oral works, containing the laws and ceremonies of Rabbinical Judaism together with commentaries, put into writing between the 2nd and 6th centuries.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AT.HTM

Talmud

The two most important works of post-biblical Jewish literature. The Babylonian (Bavli) Talmud, compiled around AD 600, and the Jerusalem (Yerushalmi) Talmud, compiled around AD 500, provide a compilation of ancient Jewish law and tradition. The Babylonian Talmud is the more authoritative version for later Judaism; both Talmuds are written ...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0012917.html

talmud

The collected commentaries on the Bible written in Babylon by Jewish scholars in the early centuries AD, it represents the body of Jewish civil and ceremonial law and tradition.
Found on http://www.movinghere.org.uk/help/glossary.htm

Talmud

the basic compendium of Jewish law, thought, and Biblical commentary, comprising *Mishnah and *Gemara; when unspecified refers to the Babylonian Talmud, the edition developed in Babylonia, and edited at end of the fifth century C.E.; the Jerusalem Talmud is the edition compiled in *Eretz Yisrael at end of the fourth century C.E.
Found on http://www.sichosinenglish.org/books/beacons-on-the-talmud-sea/glossary.htm

Talmud

The authoritative body of Jewish law and tradition incorporating the Hebrew Mishnah and the Aramaic Gemara and supplementing the scriptural law; developed in the fourth and fifth centuries C.E.
Found on http://www.ibiblio.org/expo/deadsea.scrolls.exhibit/glossary.html

Talmud

The Talmud (-; Hebrew: {Hebrew|תַּלְמוּד} talmūd `instruction, learning`, from a root lmd `teach, study`) is a central text of Rabbinic Judaism. It is also traditionally referred to as Shas ({Hebrew|ש״ס}), a Hebrew abbreviation of shisha sedarim, the `six orders`. The term `Talmud` normally refers to the Babylonian Talmud, tho...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talmud
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