Synecdoche

understanding one thing with another; the use of a part for the whole, or the whole for the part. (A form of metonymy.)
*Give us this day our daily bread. Matthew 6
*I should have been a pair of ragged claws
Found on http://www.uky.edu/AS/Classics/rhetoric.html

Synecdoche

Figure of speech where a part is made to stand for the whole e.g. in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar : 'Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.'
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

synecdoche

[n] - substituting a more inclusive term for a less inclusive one or vice versa
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=synecdoche

Synecdoche

Syn·ec'do·che (sĭn*ĕk'do*ke) noun [ Latin synecdoche , Greek synekdochh` , from to receive jointly; sy`n with + ... to receive; ... out + ... to receive.] (Rhet.) A figure or trope by which a part of a thing is put for the whole (as, fifty sail...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/266

synecdoche

noun substituting a more inclusive term for a less inclusive one or vice versa
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=synecdoche

Synecdoche

• (n.) A figure or trope by which a part of a thing is put for the whole (as, fifty sail for fifty ships), or the whole for a part (as, the smiling year for spring), the species for the genus (as, cutthroat for assassin), the genus for the species (as, a creature for a man), the name of the material for the thing made, etc.Synecdoche: words in...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/synecdoche/

synecdoche

figure of speech in which a part represents the whole, as in the expression `hired hands` for workmen or, less commonly, the whole represents a ... [3 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/200

synecdoche

a figure of speech where the part stands for the whole (for example, 'I've got wheels' for 'I have a car'). One expression that combines synecdoche and metonymy (in which a word normally associated with something is substituted for the term usually naming that thing) is 'boob tube,' meaning 'television.'
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

synecdoche

synecdoche (sinek'dukē) , figure of speech, a species of metaphor, in which a part of a person or thing is used to designate the whole—thus, “The house was built by 40 hands” for “The house was built by 20 people.” See metonymy.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0847499.html

synecdoche

Figure of speech that uses either the part to represent the whole (`There were some new faces at the meeting`, rather than new people), or the whole to stand for the part (`The West Indies beat England at cricket`, using the country to stand for the national teams in question). The figure di...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0005973.html

Synecdoche

A synecdoche (iː, {respell|si|NEK|də-kee}; from Greek synekdoche (συνεκδοχή), meaning `simultaneous understanding`) is a figure of speech in which a term for a part of something refers to the whole of something, or vice versa. An example is referring to workers as hired hands. ==Similar figures of speech== Synecdoche is a rhetorical t.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synecdoche

Synecdoche

A rhetorical trope involving a part of an object representing the whole, or the whole of an object r
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

Synecdoche

A figure of speech where the part stands for the whole (for example, 'i've got wheels' for 'i have a
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429

synecdoche

part used to refer to whole or vice versa
Found on http://phrontistery.info/s.html

Synecdoche

[genus] Synecdoche is a genus of planthoppers comprising 22 described species in the family Achilidae. All species are New World in distribution, primarily Nearctic. Their immature stages (nymphs) are commonly encountered associated with fungus (usually in logs). ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synecdoche_(genus)
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