Synecdoche

understanding one thing with another; the use of a part for the whole, or the whole for the part. (A form of metonymy.)
*Give us this day our daily bread. Matthew 6
*I should have been a pair of ragged claws
Found on http://www.uky.edu/AS/Classics/rhetoric.html

Synecdoche

Figure of speech where a part is made to stand for the whole e.g. in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar : 'Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.'
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

synecdoche

[n] - substituting a more inclusive term for a less inclusive one or vice versa
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=synecdoche

Synecdoche

Syn·ec'do·che (sĭn*ĕk'do*ke) noun [ Latin synecdoche , Greek synekdochh` , from to receive jointly; sy`n with + ... to receive; ... out + ... to receive.] (Rhet.) A figure or trope by which a part of a thing is put for the whole (as, fifty sail
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/266

synecdoche

noun substituting a more inclusive term for a less inclusive one or vice versa
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=synecdoche

Synecdoche

• (n.) A figure or trope by which a part of a thing is put for the whole (as, fifty sail for fifty ships), or the whole for a part (as, the smiling year for spring), the species for the genus (as, cutthroat for assassin), the genus for the species (as, a creature for a man), the name of the material for the thing made, etc.Synecdoche: words in
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/synecdoche/

synecdoche

figure of speech in which a part represents the whole, as in the expression `hired hands` for workmen or, less commonly, the whole represents a ... [3 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/200

Synecdoche

Synecdoche (iː or "sin-NECK-duh-key"; from Greek synekdoche (συνεκδοχή), meaning "simultaneous understanding", is a figure of speech in which a term is used in one of the following ways: ==Similar figures of speech== Synecdoche is closely related to metonymy (the figure of speech in which a term denoting one thing is used to refer to...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synecdoche

synecdoche

a figure of speech where the part stands for the whole (for example, 'I've got wheels' for 'I have a car'). One expression that combines synecdoche and metonymy (in which a word normally associated with something is substituted for the term usually naming that thing) is 'boob tube,' meaning 'television.'
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

synecdoche

synecdoche (sinek'dukē) , figure of speech, a species of metaphor, in which a part of a person or thing is used to designate the whole—thus, “The house was built by 40 hands” for “The house was built by 20 people.” See metonymy.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0847499.html

synecdoche

Figure of speech that uses either the part to represent the whole (`There were some new faces at the meeting`, rather than new people), or the whole to stand for the part (`The West Indies beat England at cricket`, using the country to stand for the national teams in question). The figure di...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0005973.html

Synecdoche

A rhetorical trope involving a part of an object representing the whole, or the whole of an object r
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

Synecdoche

A figure of speech where the part stands for the whole (for example, 'i've got wheels' for 'i have a
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429
No exact match found