Subculture

Any segment of the population which is distinguishable from the wider society by its cultural pattern.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20212

subculture

[n] - a social group within a national culture that has distinctive patterns of behavior and beliefs
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=subculture

Subculture

cultural patterns that set apart some segment of a society's population
Found on http://wps.pearsoned.co.uk/wps/media/objects/2143/2195136/glossary/glossary

subculture

1. A culture made by transferring to a fresh medium microorganisms from a previous culture; a method used to prolong the life of a particular strain where there is a tendency to degeneration in older cultures. ... 2. To make a fresh culture with material obtained from a previous one. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?subculture

subculture

noun a social group within a national culture that has distinctive patterns of behavior and beliefs
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=subculture

subculture

(sub´kul″chәr) a culture of bacteria derived from another culture. a smaller group within a larger society, having members with characteristics, needs, or behaviors not common to all members of the larger society.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

subculture

(from the article `slang`) Civilized society tends to divide into a dominant culture and various subcultures that flourish within the dominant framework. The subcultures show ... [4 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/177

subculture

subculture 1. Cultures derived from other larger cultures. 2. Groups within a host culture marked by behavior deviating from the cultural norms; such as, the punk groups, hippies, or youth gangs found in modern Western cultures. 3. Microculture; organisms or living matter on a microscopic scale.
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/586/7

Subculture

The segments within a culture that share distinguishing meanings, values, and patterns of behavior that differ from those of the overall culture. These subcultures are important to recognize in library communities that may serve a disproportionate number, whose information needs may be nontraditional and unique.
Found on http://archive.ifla.org/VII/s34/pubs/glossary.htm

Subculture

A social group exhibiting a lifestyle sufficiently different to distinguish itself from others within the larger culture.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21198

subculture

Type: Term Pronunciation: sŭb-kŭl′chūr Definitions: 1. A culture made by transferring to a fresh medium microorganisms from a previous culture; a method used to prolong the life of a particular strain where there is a tendency to degeneration in older cultures. 2. To make a fresh culture with material obtained from a previous o...
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=85838

Subculture

[biology] In biology, a subculture is a new cell or microbiological culture made by transferring some or all cells from a previous culture to fresh growth medium. This action is called subculturing or passaging the cells. Subculture is used to prolong the life and/or expand the number of cells or microorganisms in the culture. ==Role== Cell...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subculture_(biology)

Subculture

In sociology, and cultural studies, a subculture is a group of people within a culture that differentiates itself from the larger culture to which it belongs. ==Definitions== While exact definitions vary, the Oxford English Dictionary defines a subculture as `a cultural group within a larger culture, often having beliefs or interests at variance ....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subculture
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