redundancy

[Noun] Plural form: redundancies. When a person loses their job. This may be because their company no longer needs their skills or does not have enough money to keep them in work.
Example: There were 50 redundancies at Bob's company last year.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

redundancy

[n] - repetition of messages to reduce the probability of errors in transmission 2. [n] - (electronics) a system design that duplicates components to provide alternatives in case one component fails 3. [n] - the attribute of being superfluous and unneeded 4. [n] - repetition of an act needlessly
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=redundancy

Redundancy

Redundancy arises if the employer ceases to carry on or closes the business in which the employee was engaged, if the employer no longer needs the skills of the employee or needs fewer to carry out the work.
Found on http://www.clickdocs.co.uk/glossary/redundancy.htm

Redundancy

A reliability engineering technique which involves duplicating parts in a system so that if one part fails the other is capable of maintaining the integrity of the system on its own.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20474

Redundancy

(CONTROL SYSTEMS GLOSSARY) This is the capacity to switch from primary equipment to standby equipment automatically without affecting the process under control.
Found on http://www.instrument-net.co.uk/control_systemglossary.html

Redundancy

Redundancy is a form of dismissal. It could be that the company is down sizing or closing a department or closing the whole company. The staff are then made redundant as there is no longer available employment.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20636

Redundancy

Built-in duplication of a vital part of a system that can take over if a fault occurs.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

redundancy

Loss of a person's job because the job no longer exists. This may occur because the business is shrinking in size or going bankrupt, for example, owing to a recession in the economy. The firm may...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Redundancy

The existence of more than one piece of equipment any of which could perform a given function. These multiple pieces of equipment are used to help improve the reliability and availability of the system.
Found on http://www.contractorsunlimited.co.uk/glossary.shtml

Redundancy

Dismissal from employment because the job no longer exists.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20912

Redundancy

An employee may be able to bring a redundancy claim if they have worked for their employer for two years or more and are made redundant (e.g. closure of workplace or surplus labour situations)
Found on http://www.elc.org.uk/pages/lawlegalglossary.htm

Redundancy

When a worker is dismissed if the employer has ceased, or intends to cease carrying on the business; or the requirements for employees to carry out work of a particular kind, or to carry it out in the place in which they are employed have ceased or diminished. A worker may receive redundancy pay as compensation for loss of his or her job.
Found on http://www.tssa.org.uk/en/what-we-can-do-for-you/your-workplace/employment-

Redundancy

Leaving your employment because your employer no longer has work available for you to do. Redundancy can be voluntary where employees are offered the choice of leaving, or compulsory, where employees are dismissed.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20949

redundancy

Leaving your employment because your employer no longer has work available for you to do. Redundancy can be voluntary where employees are offered the choice of leaving, or compulsory, where employees are dismissed.
Found on http://www.digita.com/payrollcentral/home/reference/glossary/glossaryr/defa

Redundancy

Utilising multiple access methods so that if one goes down the systems still operate.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20957

redundancy

Occurrence of linearly arranged, largely identical, repeated sequences of DNA. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?redundancy

redundancy

redundance noun the attribute of being superfluous and unneeded; `the use of industrial robots created redundancy among workers`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=redundancy

redundancy

noun repetition of an act needlessly
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=redundancy

redundancy

noun (electronics) a system design that duplicates components to provide alternatives in case one component fails
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=redundancy

redundancy

noun repetition of messages to reduce the probability of errors in transmission
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=redundancy

Redundancy

• (n.) The quality or state of being redundant; superfluity; superabundance; excess. • (n.) Surplusage inserted in a pleading which may be rejected by the court without impairing the validity of what remains. • (n.) That which is redundant or in excess; anything superfluous or superabundant.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/redundancy/

redundancy

(from the article `communication`) Although rarely shown on diagrammatic models of this version of the communication process, redundancy—the repetition of elements within a message ... A redundancy of 50 percent means that roughly half the letters in a sentence could be omitted and the message still be reconstructable. The question...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/24

Redundancy

[user interfaces] The user interface of an application software or operating system is sometimes described as redundant if the same task can be executed by several different methods. For example, a user is often able to open or save a project by navigating a menu with the mouse or keyboard, by clicking a single button with the mouse, or by
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redundancy_(user_interfaces)

Redundancy

[total quality management] In total quality management, TQM, redundancy in quality or redundant quality means quality which exceeds the required quality level. Tolerances may be too accurate, for example, creating unnecessarily high costs of production. Redundant quality is sometimes incorrectly used instead of even quality or constant qual
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redundancy_(total_quality_management)

Redundancy

[linguistics] In linguistics, redundancy is the construction of a phrase that presents some idea using more information, often via multiple means, than is necessary for one to be able understand the idea. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redundancy_(linguistics)
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