Quinoa

(Chenopodium) These hardy annuals or perennials may be grown for decoration and some kinds are vegetables. They come from various parts of the world such as Europe and China and are naturalized in America.…
Found on http://www.botany.com/chenopodium.html

Quinoa

An ancient pearl-like grain from the Andes, rich in protein, lysine, calcium, and iron. Cooked like rice but requires less time and expands to four times its original volume. Delicate flavor similar to couscous. Used as a main dish, side dish, or addition to soups, salads or puddings. Available in most health food stores.
Found on http://www.chowbaby.com/10_2000/glossary/glossary.html?synchpage=21&Z=75017

Quinoa

(Vegetarian) This is the grain of the future. It was the staple food of the Inca Empire, reffered to as the Mother Grain and revered as sacred. Quinoa provides all the amino acids, including lysine a scarce amino acid in vegetables and methionine and cystine in an almost perfect profile! These are especially important for vegetarians because most p...
Found on http://v_w_o.tripod.com/GLOSSARY.html

Quinoa

Qui·no'a noun The seeds of a kind of goosewort ( Chenopodium Quinoa ), used in Chili and Peru for making porridge or cakes; also, food thus made.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/Q/11

quinoa

The seeds of a kind of goosewort (Chenopodium Quinoa), used in Chili and Peru for making porridge or cakes; also, food thus made. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?quinoa

Quinoa

• (n.) The seeds of a kind of goosewort (Chenopodium Quinoa), used in Chili and Peru for making porridge or cakes; also, food thus made.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/quinoa/

quinoa

(from the article `Ancient Grains`) Amaranth, extolled as an elixir by the Aztecs, showed up in European and North American cereals, breads, and crackers, and quinoa, a staple of the ... ...Wild camelids were hunted as early as 10,000 ; by 7500–6000 llama and alpaca remains are so common in archaeological sites that they had...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/q/8

quinoa

quinoa (kēnwä') , tall annual herb (Chenopodium quinoa) of the family Chenopodiaceae (goosefoot family), whose seeds have provided a staple food for peoples of the higher Andes since pre-Columbian times. The plant resembles the related lamb's-quarters of North America; its seeds are t...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0840830.html

Quinoa

A highly nutritious grain originally from the Andes, now cultivated elsewhere.
Found on http://www.goodcooking.com/winedefs.html

Quinoa

Quinoa (ɑː, from kinwa), a species of goosefoot (Chenopodium), is a grain crop grown primarily for its edible seeds. It is a pseudocereal rather than a true cereal, as it is not a member of the true grass family. As a chenopod, quinoa is closely related to species such as beetroots, spinach and tumbleweeds. It is high in protein, lacks gluten, a...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quinoa

Quinoa

Quinoa (pronounced
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21801

Quinoa

Pronounced (KEEN-wah). A natural whole grain grown in South America. Originally used by the Incas some 5000 years ago, it can be substituted for rice in most recipes. It is a unique grain in that it serves as a complete protein containing essential amino acids.
Found on http://www.foodworks-intl.com/page1_glossary_of_culinary_terminology.htm

quinoa

grain seeds of the goosefoot plant
Found on http://phrontistery.info/q.html
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