oedema

Intumescence or blister formation because of an increase in intercellular water. (Also edema.)
Found on http://ppathw3.cals.cornell.edu/glossary/Defs_O.htm

Oedema

(Edema) Intumescence or blister formation due to an increase in inter-cellular water, as in leaves.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Oedema

Excessive accumulation of fluid in the body tissues. The resultant swelling may be local, as with an injury or inflammation, or more generalised in the chest and abdominal cavities or elsewhere.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

oedema

Oedema means swelling. It is caused by fluid retention in the body's tissues, and is very common during pregnancy. It can also be a sign of kidney or urological problems.
Found on http://www.babycentre.co.uk/glossary/o/

Oedema

Tissue swelling following damage. A frequent complication of a cerebro-vascular accident or closed head injury.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20437

Oedema

Swelling caused by too much fluid in the tissues under the skin.
Found on http://www.kerri.thomas.btinternet.co.uk/glossary.html

Oedema

Swelling due to build-up of fluid within a body tissue.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20560

Oedema

Infiltration of liquid into tissue (seen in the skin in the form of a painless swelling).
Found on http://www.zirtek.co.uk/allergies.php

oedema

See edema
Found on http://sis.nlm.nih.gov/enviro/iupacglossary/glossaryo.html

Oedema

abnormal build-up of fluid in the body, which may cause visible swelling
Found on http://www.medichecks.com/glossary.cfm?ltr=O

Oedema

An excess of fluid within a tissue. It can occur in any site, tissue or organ. There are several `sub-types` of oedema - Dependant oedema, where the oedema collects in lowest part because of gravity This is usually the lower leg but in someone who is bedfast it could be over the lower back or the lungs. In severe cases the oedema can be generalised
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Oedema

An excessive amount of fluid in the body tissues causing swelling
Found on http://www.dwp.gov.uk/medical/med_conditions/glossary.html

Oedema

swelling caused by retention of fluid such as might occur with a weakened heart
Found on http://www.thornber.net/medicine/html/medgloss.html

oedema

Collection of fluid in a tissue causing swelling which, if indented, only slowly regains its former shape.
Found on http://www.bmb.leeds.ac.uk/mbiology/ug/ugteach/icu8/glossary/glossary.html

Oedema

the accumulation of an excess of fluid (mainly water) in the body [NHS Direct]
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Oedema

Swelling due to accumulation of fluid in tissue.
Found on http://www.gadsbywicks.co.uk/uploaded/3822.pdf

oedema

(= edema (USA)) Swelling of tissue: can result from increased permeability of vascular endothelium.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

OEdema

OE·de'ma noun [ New Latin , from Greek ... a swelling, tumor, from ... to swell.] (Medicine) A swelling from effusion of watery fluid in the cellular tissue beneath the skin or mucous membrance; dropsy of the subcutaneous cellular tissue. [ Written also edema .]
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/O/12

oedema

<clinical sign> The presence of abnormally large amounts of fluid in the intercellular tissue spaces of the body, usually applied to demonstrable accumulation of excessive fluid in the subcutaneous tissues. ... Oedema may be localised, due to venous or lymphatic obstruction or to increased vascular permeability or it may be systemic due to he
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?oedema

Oedema

• (n.) A swelling from effusion of watery fluid in the cellular tissue beneath the skin or mucous membrance; dropsy of the subcutaneous cellular tissue.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/oedema/

oedema

(Gr. oidema swelling) the presence of abnormally large amounts of fluid in the intercellular tissue spaces of the body; usually applied to demonstrable accumulation of excessive fluid in the subcutaneous tissues. Edema may be localized, due to venous or lymphatic obstruction or to increased vascular permeability, or it may be systemic due to heart.
Found on http://users.ugent.be/~rvdstich/eugloss/DIC/dictio60.html

Oedema

See fluid retention
Found on http://www.kidney.org.au/KidneyDisease/KidneyGlossary/tabid/679/Default.xht

oedema

Any abnormal accumulation of fluid in tissues or cavities of the body; waterlogging of the tissues due to excessive loss of plasma through the capillary walls. It may be generalized (the condition once known as dropsy) or confined to one area, such as the ankles. Oedema may be mechanical – the result of obstructed veins or heart failure &#...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0011374.html

Oedema

Fluid retention, which causes the body tissues to puff out.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21460

Oedema

Swelling due to the retention of fluids in the tissues....
Found on http://www.diet-and-health.net/glossary/
No exact match found