Nave

In architecture, a nave is the part of a church westward of the choir in which the general congregation assemble, In large buildings it consists of a central division, or body, with two or more aisles, and there is sometimes a series of small chapels at the sides beyond the aisles. In smaller buildings the nave is often without aisles, but has some...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TN.HTM

Nave

[river] The Nave is a river in France, located in the department of Pas-de-Calais. It has its source in Nédonchel, then flows into the Clarence up to Gonnehem after a course of {convert|22|km|mi}. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nave_(river)

Nave

[disambiguation] A nave is the middle or body of a church, or (etymologically unrelated) the hub of a wheel. Nave or naves may also refer to: ==Places== ==Music== ==Other uses== ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nave_(disambiguation)

Nave

Principal hall of a church, extending from the narthex to the chancel.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20018

nave

The central longitudinal space of a bascilican church. It is usually flanked on its lond sides by aislas which are separated from the nave by columns or piers. In many churches, the lay congregation stand in the nave to attend religious services.
Found on http://www.pitt.edu/~medart/menuglossary/INDEX.HTM

Nave

the western arm of the church, where the congregation stood.
Found on http://www.britainexpress.com/History/medieval/church-glossary.htm

Nave

The un-consecrated main body of the church where the congregation gathered for the service and the area in which the priest would descend to deliver his sermon. The nave was also used for secular activities and served as a church hall where the parishioners could gather in relative shelter. The upkeep of the Nave was the responsibility of the laity...
Found on http://www.mdlp.co.uk/genweb/glossary.htm

nave

[n] - the central area of a church
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=nave

Nave

The main body of the church.
Found on http://www.digital-documents.co.uk/archi/gloschur.htm

Nave

Main body of church, normally west of sanctuary, transept and choir.
Found on http://www.digital-documents.co.uk/archi/gloschur.htm

nave

the western part of the body of a church, often flanked by aisles
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20559

nave

In architecture, the central area of a church extending from the entrance to the crossing, if any; otherwise, up to the altar. It was developed by the early Christian builders out...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Nave

The nave is the main body of a church, west of the chancel. It is where most of the congregation sits. It may be flanked by aisles.
Found on http://www.keystothepast.info/durhamcc/k2p.nsf/k2pGlossaryList?readform&let

Nave

the western limb of a church, where the congregation meets.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20935

Nave

In pre-Reformation churches, the part of the worship space used by lay people. Often used for the body of a church outside the chancel area. Related Words: Chancel
Found on http://www.maintainyourchurch.org.uk/ToolkitModules/Toolkit1Glossary/tabid/

Nave

The largest part of most churches, primarily naves are used to accommodate the people or congregation in church services. In medieval times this was the part owned by the laity – the ordinary worshippers, and set apart from the chancel – the section owned by the clergy, and the holiest in the church. Naves are usually tall and open, w...
Found on http://www.architecture.com/HowWeBuiltBritain/Glossary.xhtml

Nave

In architecture, this is any longitudinal area within a covered building. In a church it is the central area where the congregation gathers when attending religious services. It leads from the main entrance up to the chancel or altar. A church may have a single nave, or the central nave may be flanked by smaller ones, called side aisles, which are ...
Found on http://www.virtualani.org/glossary/index.htm

Nave

The main body of the church, where the congregation sits.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20941

Nave

The place where the congregation gather for worship.
Found on http://www.stpeter.dircon.co.uk/pages/glossary/glossaryn.htm

Nave

Nave (nāv) noun [ Anglo-Saxon nafu ; akin to Dutch naaf , German nabe , Old High German naba , Icelandic nöf , Danish nav , Swedish naf , Sanskrit nābhi nave and navel: confer Latin umbo boss of a shield. √260. Confer N...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/N/7

Nave

Nave noun [ French nef , from Latin navis ship, to which the church was often likened; akin to Greek nay`archo`s , Sanskrit nāus, and perhaps to Anglo-Saxon naca boat, German nachen , Icelandic nökkvi ; confer Latin nare to swim, float. Con...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/N/7

nave

1. The block in the center of a wheel, from which the spokes radiate, and through which the axle passes; called also hub or hob. ... 2. The navel. ... Origin: AS. Nafu; akin to D. Naaf, G. Nabe, OHG. Naba, Icel. Nof, Dan. Nav, Sw. Naf, Skr. Nabhi nave and navel: cf. L. Umbo boss of a shield. 260. Cf. Navel. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 M...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?nave

nave

noun the central area of a church
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=nave

Nave

• (n.) The navel. • (n.) The middle or body of a church, extending from the transepts to the principal entrances, or, if there are no transepts, from the choir to the principal entrance, but not including the aisles. • (n.) The block in the center of a wheel, from which the spokes radiate, and through which the axle passes; -- called...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/nave/

nave

central and principal part of a Christian church, extending from the entrance (the narthex) to the transepts (transverse aisle crossing the nave in ... [3 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/n/19
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