Leasehold

The right to live in a home on long-term tenancy, typically lasting for around 100 years. Such homes are usually owned by a freeholder to whom leaseholders have to pay ground rent and service charges. If a number of conditions are met, a leaseholder or leaseholders can buy the freehold - a process known as enfranchisement.
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leasehold

[n] - land or property held under a lease
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Leasehold

When you buy a leasehold property, essentially you are buying nothing more than the right to occupy a building for a given length of time. You will have to pay ground rent and maintenance in addition to a one-off payment that buys ownership of the lease until sold or it runs out. The amount of alterations you can make to the property varies accorda
Found on http://www.mortgage-terms.co.uk/mortgage-glossary/l/leasehold.html

leasehold

Land held under a lease for a number of years
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Leasehold

When ownership of a property is subject to lease from the freeholder (the owner of the land upon which the property sits). Leasehold properties - usually flats – are leased for a fixed number of years, usually 99 years or more
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Leasehold

Where land or buildings are let to a tenant the tenant is often able to sell their lease. The interest they sell is leasehold, i.e. it is held on a lease. In all cases of leasehold a ground rent will be payable.
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leasehold

In law, land or property held by a tenant (lessee) for a specified period (unlike freehold, outright ownership), usually at a rent from the landlord (lessor). Under English law, houses and flats are...
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Leasehold

Land ownership restricted to a number of years and with conditions written in a lease.
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Leasehold

Land ownership restricted to a number of years and with conditions written in a lease.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20704

Leasehold

Lease'hold` adjective Held by lease.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/24

Leasehold

Lease'hold` noun A tenure by lease; specifically, land held as personalty under a lease for years.
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leasehold

noun land or property held under a lease
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Leasehold

An asset providing the right to use property under a lease agreement.
Found on http://www.duke.edu/~charvey/Classes/wpg/bfglosl.htm

Leasehold

• (a.) Held by lease. • (n.) A tenure by lease; specifically, land held as personalty under a lease for years.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/leasehold/

Leasehold

The legal word for the ownership of a lease. It usually refers to a flat but also includes leases on commercial properties such as shops and offices. The term of a lease can vary from six months to 999 years.
Found on http://www.woolwich.co.uk/mortgages/mortgage-glossary.html

Leasehold

- Property INTEREST a LESSEE owns in the leased property.
Found on http://www.nysscpa.org/prof_library/guide.htm

Leasehold

(n) Leasehold is the property which was held by a person by virtue of a lease agreement between him and the owner, permitting him to hold the property for such a period as said in the lease agreement for a consideration payable to the owner of the property. It differs from the freehold property to the extend that it is returnable after the expiry o
Found on http://www.legal-explanations.com/definitions/leasehold.htm

leasehold

n. the real estate which is the subject of a lease (a written rental agreement for an extended period of time). The term is commonly used to describe improvements on real property when the improvements are built on land owned by one party which is leased for a long term (such as 99 years) to the owner of the building. For example, the Pacific Land
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leasehold

In law, land or property held by a tenant (lessee) for a specified period (unlike freehold, outright ownership), usually at a rent from the landlord (lessor)
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Leasehold

If you buy a leasehold property, you own the property for a set number of years but not the land on which the property is built, as opposed to freehold where you own both the property and the land indefinitely.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Leasehold

If you buy a leasehold property, you own the property for a set number of years but not the land on which the property is built, as opposed to freehold where you own both the property and the land indefinitely.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Leasehold

A leaseholder holds the title to land only for a finite term i.e. the length of the lease upon payment of a consideration e.g. rent.
Found on http://www.carringtondean.co.uk/glossary.xhtml

LEASEHOLD

The land on which a property stands is not owned by you, but by a landlord, with an agreement for you to use this land for an agreed period. Leases are commonly 100 years and most leasehold properties are flats and maisonettes.
Found on http://www.edwards-associates.co.uk/frames/glossary.htm

leasehold

status [of] property or land which was [under] tenure by lease either for life, lives, or a stated term (R 167)
Found on http://info.sjc.ox.ac.uk/forests/glossary.htm

leasehold

status [of] property or land which was [under] tenure by lease either for life, lives, or a stated term (R 167)
Found on http://info.sjc.ox.ac.uk/forests/glossary.htm
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