Kenning

A periphrastic compound whereby two or more nouns are used to replace another noun e.g. 'oar-steed' for ship or 'whale-road' for sea. Kenning was commonly used in Old English or Old Norse verse and is often metonymic in character.
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

kenning

[n] - conventional metaphoric name for something, used especially in Old English and Old Norse poetry
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=kenning

Kenning

a compound expression used in Old English and Norse poetry, which named something without using its name, for example mouse catcher = cat. Anglo-Saxons often used kennings to name their swords: death bringer. A poem made of kennings would be a list of such expressions about one subject: MY DOG ankle biter bone cruncher night howler rabbit catcher ...
Found on http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/primary/publications/literacy/63285/nls_fw

Kenning

Ken'ning noun [ See Ken , transitive verb ] 1. Range of sight. [ Obsolete] Bacon. 2. The limit of vision at sea, being a distance of about twenty miles.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/K/5

kenning

1. Range of sight. ... 2. The limit of vision at sea, being a distance of about twenty miles. ... See: Ken. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?kenning

kenning

noun conventional metaphoric name for something, used especially in Old English and Old Norse poetry
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=kenning

Kenning

• (v. t.) Range of sight. • (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Ken • (v. t.) The limit of vision at sea, being a distance of about twenty miles.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/kenning/

kenning

concise compound or figurative phrase replacing a common noun, especially in Old Germanic, Old Norse, and Old English poetry. A kenning is commonly a ... [4 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/k/21

kenning

a compound word in Old English poetry that replaces the usual name for something, often involving metonymy.
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

kenning

In Anglo-Saxon and Norse literature, a figure of speech in which a descriptive phrase is used to refer to people or objects. Well-known examples (from the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf) include banhus (bone house) for body, hron rad (whale road) for sea, and helmberend
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0089376.html

Kenning

[unit] A kenning is an obsolete unit of dry measure in the imperial system, equal to two pecks or half a bushel. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenning_(unit)

Kenning

A kenning (Modern Icelandic pronunciation: cʰɛnːiŋk; derived from Old Norse) is a type of circumlocution, in the form of a compound that employs figurative language in place of a more concrete single-word noun. Kennings are strongly associated with Old Norse and later Icelandic and Anglo-Saxon poetry. They usually consist of two words, and are...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenning

Kenning

A form of compounding in Old English, Old Norse, and Germanic poetry. In this poetic device, the poe
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

Kenning

a compound word in Old English poetry that replaces the usual name for something, often involving me
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429
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