Inhumation

A human burial where bones are articulated and have not been burnt. The body may be in a variety of positions; such as laid on the back, side, crouched and so on. In the Iron Age it was common for crouched burials as at West Chevington, (Northumberland). Since the Roman period most inhumations have been on the back.
Found on http://www.keystothepast.info/durhamcc/k2p.nsf/k2pGlossaryList?readform&let

Inhumation

In`hu·ma'tion noun [ Confer French inhumation .] 1. The act of inhuming or burying; interment. 2. (Old Chem.) The act of burying vessels in warm earth in order to expose their contents to a steady moderate heat; the state of being thus exposed. 3. (Medicine)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/I/61

inhumation

1. The act of inhuming or burying; interment. ... 2. <chemistry> The act of burying vessels in warm earth in order to expose their contents to a steady moderate heat; the state of being thus exposed. ... 3. <medicine> Arenation. ... Origin: Cf. F. Inhumation. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?inhumation

Inhumation

• (n.) Arenation. • (n.) The act of inhuming or burying; interment. • (n.) The act of burying vessels in warm earth in order to expose their contents to a steady moderate heat; the state of being thus exposed.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/inhumation/

inhumation

(from the article `burial`) Burial in the ground by hollowing out a trench in the earth for the body or covering it with rocks or dirt dates back at least to Middle Paleolithic ... The beginning of the Iron Age was in many areas marked by change in burial rites. The extensive use of cremation during the Urnfield Period was ... ...dea...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/i/23
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