Hookworm

A parasitic worm that thrives in unsanitary conditions.
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hookworm

[n] - infestation of the intestines by hookworms which enter the body (usually) through the skin 2. [n] - parasitic blood-sucking roundworms having hooked mouth parts to fasten to the intestinal wall of human and other hosts
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Hookworm

infestation by a small, round, blood-sucking parasite; commonly causes a rash on the foot, but can also cause cough, pneumonia, and anaemia
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Hookworm

Hookworm: An intestinal parasite that usually causes diarrhea or cramps. Heavy infestation with hookworm can be serious for newborns, children, pregnant women, and persons who are malnourished. Hookworm infections occur mainly in tropical and subtropical climates and affect about 1 billion people -- about one-fifth of the world's population. One of
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hookworm

A parasitic intestinal infection caused most commonly by Necator americanus or Ancylostoma duodenale. Individuals may be asymptomatic and be carriers. Infection occurs when the larvae invade exposed skin, most commonly the feet. ... Symptoms can be similar to peptic ulcer disease. ... (27 Sep 1997) ...
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hookworm

noun parasitic bloodsucking roundworms having hooked mouth parts to fasten to the intestinal wall of human and other hosts
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hookworm

(hook┬┤wurm″) any of various parasitic roundworms that affect mammals, including humans, around the world. They enter the human body through the skin and migrate to the intestines, where they attach to the intestinal wall and suck blood for nourishment. Species of Necator and Ancylostoma are the most common human p...
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hookworm

(from the article `hookworm disease`) ...parasitic infestation of humans, dogs, or cats caused by bloodsucking worms (see photograph) living in the small intestine—sometimes associated ... Hookworm, or Ancylostoma duodenale, infection begins when the worm is in the larval stage. It penetrates the skin, usually of the feet, migrates...
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Hookworm

The hookworm is a parasitic nematode that lives in the small intestine of its host, which may be a mammal such as a dog, cat, or human. Two species of hookworms commonly infect humans, Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus. A. duodenale predominates in the Middle East, North Africa, India and (formerly) in southern Europe, while N. american
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hookworm

hookworm, any of a number of bloodsucking nematodes in the phylum Nematoda, order Strongiloidae that live as parasites in humans and other mammals and attach themselves to the host's intestines by means of hooks. Hookworm infection in humans is caused by infestation with Ancylostoma duodenale (the E...
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hookworm

Type: Term Pronunciation: huk′wŏrm Definitions: 1. Common name for bloodsucking nematodes of the family Ancyclostomatidae, chiefly members of the genera Ancylostoma (the Old World hookworm), Necator, and Uncinaria, and including the species A. caninum (dog hookworm) and N. americanus (New World hookworm).
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hookworm

Parasitic roundworm (see worm) with hooks around its mouth. It lives mainly in tropical and subtropical regions, but also in humid areas in temperate climates. The eggs are hatched in damp soil, and the larvae bore into the host's skin, usually through the soles of the feet. They make their way to the small intestine, where they live by sucking...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0008319.html
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