Fili

[Moscow] Fili (Фили́) is a former suburban village, now a neighborhood in the western section of Moscow, Russia, notable for the events of September 1812, following the Battle of Borodino. The village was located between the Moskva River and Poklonnaya Hill, near the present-day Fili station of Moscow Metro and the extant Church of the
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fili_(Moscow)

Fili

(from the article `architecture, Western`) ...transformed its modes into a clearly expressed national style that became known as the Naryshkin Baroque, a delightful example of which is the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/24

fili

professional poet in ancient Ireland whose official duties were to know and preserve the tales and genealogies and to compose poems recalling the ... [4 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/24

Fili

[Moscow Metro] Fili (Фили) is a surface-level station on the Filyovskaya Line of the Moscow Metro. The station was opened on November 7, 1959, as the last surface side platform station on the line. The dual platforms are protected by canopies and are intersected at either end by road overpasses that provide additional shelter for waitin
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fili_(Moscow_Metro)

Fili

A fili was a member of an elite class of poets in Ireland, up into the Renaissance, when the Irish class system was dismantled. ==Etymology== The word "file" is thought to derive from the Proto-Celtic *widluios, meaning "seer, one who sees" (attested on the Gaulish inscription from Larzac as "uidluias", which is the feminine genitive singula...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fili

FILI

FILI (Finnish Literature Exchange) is an expert and export organisation, which supports the translation, printing and publishing of Finnish literature and promotes its awareness abroad. Founded in 1977, FILI is part of the Finnish Literature Society. ==Overview== Each year, FILI: ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FILI

Fili

A class of learned Irish poet in pre-Christian and early Christian Ireland. Legally, a fili had simi
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385
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