Epimorphosis

Arthropod development in which all specifically larval forms are suppressed or passed before hatching; the juvenile that hatches has the adult body form.
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epimorphosis

Pattern of regeneration in which proliferation precedes the development of a new part. Opposite of morphallaxis.
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epimorphosis

<cell biology> Pattern of regeneration in which proliferation precedes the development of a new part. Opposite of morphallaxis. ... (18 Nov 1997) ...
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epimorphosis

(ep″ĭ-mor-fo´sis) the regeneration of a piece of an organism by proliferation at the cut surface. adj., epimor´phic., adj.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

epimorphosis

epimorphosis 1. Passing several stages of growth in the same form, especially of segmented insects. 2. Regeneration of a part of an organism by extensive cell proliferation and differentiation at the cut surface.
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/1336/3

epimorphosis

Type: Term Pronunciation: ep′i-mōr-fō′sis Definitions: 1. Regeneration of a part of an organism by growth at the cut surface.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=29847

Epimorphosis

A type of development in which the insect emerges from the egg with its full compliment of body segments (opposite of anamorphosis).
Found on http://www.ag.auburn.edu/enpl/courses/glossary.htm

Epimorphosis

Epimorphosis is the regeneration of tissues or organs through the dedifferentiation of existing, differentiated adult tissues. Adult cells dedifferentiate (though not fully into embryonic stem cells) into a mass of cells that then re-differentiates into the new structure. This phenomenon is seen in frog, newt, and salamander limbs. Their limbs may
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epimorphosis
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