Entrainment

[physical geography] In physical geography, entrainment is the process by which surface sediment is incorporated into a fluid flow (such as air or water) as part of the operation of erosion. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entrainment_(physical_geography)

Entrainment

[chronobiology] Entrainment, within the study of chronobiology, occurs when rhythmic physiological or behavioral events match their period and phase to that of an environmental oscillation. A common example is the entrainment of circadian rhythms to the daily light–dark cycle, which ultimately is determined by the Earth`s rotation. The te
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entrainment_(chronobiology)

Entrainment

[engineering] Entrainment as commonly used in various branches of engineering may be defined as the entrapment of one substance by another substance. For example: ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entrainment_(engineering)

Entrainment

[meteorology] Entrainment is a phenomenon of the atmosphere which occurs when a turbulent flow captures a non-turbulent flow. It is typically used to refer to the capture of a wind flow of high moisture content, or in the case of tropical cyclones, the capture of drier air. Entrainment is the mixing of environmental air into a preexisting a
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entrainment_(meteorology)

Entrainment

[hydrodynamics] Entrainment is the movement of one fluid by another. One fluid moving in another can push or pull the other along with it. Eductors or eductor-jet pumps are an excellent example. They are used onboard many ships to pump flooded out compartments in the event of an accident. Seawater is pumped to the eductor and forced through
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entrainment_(hydrodynamics)

Entrainment

[physics] Entrainment has been used to refer to the process of mode locking of coupled driven oscillators, which is the process whereby two interacting oscillating systems, which have different periods when they function independently, assume a common period. The two oscillators may fall into synchrony, but other phase relationships are als
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entrainment_(physics)

Entrainment

(Battery) The process whereby gasses generated in the cell carry electrolyte through the vent cap.
Found on http://www.youngco.com/young2.asp?ID=4&Type=3

Entrainment

The process of being captured in cooling water of a power plant. This usually applied to small organisms such as fish larvae and zooplankton.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Entrainment

One of three distinct processes involved in erosion. More specifically, it is the process of particle lifting by an agent of erosion.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/e.html

entrainment

An effect in which the material from the medium through which an astrophysical jet is traveling is pulled into the jet itself. Interstellar gas may be entrained by the jets in active galaxies. Similarly, neutrons in the upper layers of the Sun's atmosphere may be entrained by the solar wind.
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/E/entrainment.html

Entrainment

[biomusicology] Entrainment in the biomusicological sense refers to the synchronization of organisms to an external rhythm, usually produced by other organisms with whom they interact socially. Examples include firefly flashing, mosquito wing clapping as well as human music and dance such as foot tapping. ==Beat induction== Beat induction i
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entrainment_(biomusicology)

Entrainment

(Streams) The incidental trapping of fish and other aquatic organisms in the water, for example, used for cooling electrical power plants or in waters being diverted for irrigation or similar purposes.
Found on http://www.streamnet.org/glossary.html
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