Duct

[anatomy] In anatomy and physiology, a duct is a circumscribed channel leading from an exocrine gland or organ. ==Types of ducts== Examples include: ==Duct system== As ducts travel from the acinus which generates the fluid to the target, the ducts become larger and the epithelium becomes thicker. The parts of the system are classified as fo
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duct_(anatomy)

Duct

a tube which carries a secretion onto the surface of skin or mucosa.
Found on http://www.eclipse.co.uk/moordent/page5.html

duct

[n] - a continuous tube formed by a row of elongated cells lacking intervening end walls 2. [n] - a bodily passage or tube lined with epithelial cells and conveying a secretion or other substance 3. [n] - an enclosed conduit for a fluid
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=duct

Duct

A pipe or closed conduit made of sheet metal, fibreglass board, or other suitable material used for conducting air to and from an air handling unit. See also: Duct Acoustics.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/d/u/duct/source.html

Duct

A space set-aside for services. May be vertical or horizontal.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20698

Duct

Prefabricated sheet steel trunking to provide heating and ventilating service to building.
Found on http://www.corusconstruction.com/en/design_guidance/the_blue_book/

Duct

(ducts) A tube or channel which carries liquid or chemicals from one part of the body to another. For example, ducts in the breasts carry milk to the nipple.
Found on http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/utilities/glossary/index.htm?search=d

Duct

The ink reservoir on a press.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20829

Duct

Duct: A passage or a tube with well-defined walls suitable for the conveyance of air or liquids, as the bile duct and the pancreatic duct. Duct is a contraction of the New Latin word ductus. The Romans, however, used the word canalis to designate a conduit.
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=10672

Duct

A cylindrical or rectangular 'tube' used to move air either from exhaust or intake, and for distributing warm air from the heating plant to rooms, or air from a conditioning device or as cold air returns. The installation is referred to as 'duct work.'
Found on http://www.rookinspections.com/glossary/glossaryd.shtml

Duct

Here used to describe a channel within the thickness of a wall or other structural component, used to accommodate pipes or cables, or for ventilation or heating.
Found on http://www.maintainyourchurch.org.uk/ToolkitModules/Toolkit1Glossary/tabid/

Duct

Duct noun [ Latin ductus a leading, conducting, conduit, from ducere , ductum , to lead. See Duke , and confer Douche .] 1. Any tube or canal by which a fluid or other substance is conducted or conveyed. 2. (Anat.) One of the vessels of an an
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/128

duct

<anatomy> A passage with well defined walls, especially a tube for the passage of excretions or secretions. ... Synonym: ductus. ... Origin: L. Ductus from ducere = to draw or lead ... (18 Nov 1997) ...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?duct

duct

epithelial duct noun a bodily passage or tube lined with epithelial cells and conveying a secretion or other substance; `the tear duct was obstructed`; `the alimentary canal`; `poison is released through a channel in the snake`s fangs`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=duct

duct

noun an enclosed conduit for a fluid
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=duct

duct

noun a continuous tube formed by a row of elongated cells lacking intervening end walls
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=duct

duct

(dukt) a passage with well-defined walls, especially a tubular structure for the passage of excretions or secretions. adj., ductal, adj. .
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Duct

• (n.) Any tube or canal by which a fluid or other substance is conducted or conveyed. • (n.) One of the vessels of an animal body by which the products of glandular secretion are conveyed to their destination. • (n.) Guidance; direction. • (n.) A large, elongated cell, either round or prismatic, usually found associated with wo
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/duct/

duct

(L. ductus from ducere to draw or lead) a passage with well-defined walls, especially a tube for the passage of excretions or secretions; called also ductus (NA).
Found on http://users.ugent.be/~rvdstich/eugloss/DIC/dictio27.html

duct

duct 1. A conduit, channel, or tube, for the conveyance of water or other liquid. 2. A pipe or tube through which air is conveyed for cooling, ventilation, etc. 3. A conduit for an electric cable or the like. 4. A tube or canal in the animal body, by which the bodily fluids are conveyed. Formerly used in a wide sense, so as to include the bloo...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2734/5

duct

Type: Term Pronunciation: dŭkt Definitions: 1. A tubular structure giving exit to the secretion of a gland or organ, capable of conducting fluid. Synonyms: ductus
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=26794

Duct

[HVAC] Ducts are used in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) to deliver and remove air. These needed airflows include, for example, supply air, return air, and exhaust air. Ducts also deliver, most commonly as part of the supply air, ventilation air. As such, air ducts are one method of ensuring acceptable indoor air quality a
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duct_(HVAC)

Duct

A channel for holding and protecting conductors and cables, made of metal or an insulating material, usually circular in cross section like a pipe. Also referred to as Conduit.
Found on http://www.youngco.com/young2.asp?ID=4&Type=3

DUCT

A cylindrical or rectangular 'tube' used to move air either from exhaust or intake. The installation is referred to as 'duct work'.
Found on http://www.proofrock.com/glossary.html

Duct

Any tube, pipe or other conduit by which air or fluid is transfered.
Found on http://www.areforum.org/up/GeneralStructures/JOIST%20AND%20STRUCTURAL%20GLO
No exact match found