Crazing

Aging lines that run through the paint on vintage toys and banks distinguishing them from new examples.
Found on http://www.antiquetoys.com/glossary.html

Crazing

Dried paint that has developed lines resembling crazy paving. Causes include incomplete drying of the paint film below when recoating, where the solvent in the topcoat re-dissolves the first coat, or by an aggressive solvent in the topcoat attacking the first coat. If using different types of paint in successive coats you should always do a test ar
Found on http://www.hobbyshed.co.uk/model_kit_modelmaking_guides_glossary_abcd.htm

crazing

Crazing describes small hairline cracks that can appear over time. Crazing is often caused by a mismatch in the thermal expansions of surfaces. There are ways to treat crazing; however if crazing is visible, it is an indication of a significant problem which needs expert attention.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20712

crazing

A network of checks or cracks appearing on the surface.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20742

crazing

An internal condition existing in the laminate base material in the form of connected white spots or crosses on or below the surface of the base laminate, reflecting the separation of glass fibres from resin at the connecting weave intersections. Crazing is usually related to mechanically-induced stress. (Also see ‘ measling`)
Found on http://www.ami.ac.uk/courses/topics/0100_gls/glossary/glossc.htm

Crazing

Region of ultrafine cracks that may develop on or under a resin surface.
Found on http://www.komprex.com/Glossary/index.htm

Crazing

A series of hairline cracks in the surface of weathered materials, having a web-like appearance. Also, hairline cracks in pre-finished metals caused by bending or forming (see Brake Metal).
Found on http://www.rookinspections.com/glossary/glossaryc.shtml

crazing

See crackle.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Crazing

Craz'ing present participle & verbal noun of Craze , v. Hence: noun Fine cracks resulting from shrinkage on the surface of glazed pottery, concrete, or other material. The admired crackle in some Oriental potteries and porcelains is crazing produce
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/183

crazing

In dentistry, the appearance of minute cracks on the surface of plastic restorations such as filling materials, denture teeth, or denture bases. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?crazing

Crazing

• (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Craze • (n.) Fine cracks resulting from shrinkage on the surface of glazed pottery, concrete, or other material. The admired crackle in some Oriental potteries and porcelains is crazing produced in a foreseen and regulated way. In common pottery it is often the result of exposure to undue heat, and the beginning of
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/crazing/

crazing

Type: Term Pronunciation: krā′zing Definitions: 1. In dentistry, the appearance of minute cracks on the surface of plastic restorations such as filling materials, denture teeth, or denture bases.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=21142

CRAZING

A series of hairline cracks in the surface of weathered materials, having a web-like appearance. Also, hairline cracks in pre-finished metals caused by bending or forming. (see brake metal)
Found on http://www.proofrock.com/glossary.html

Crazing

Very fine lines or crystalline patterns in the finish usually caused by too much catalyst.
Found on http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/A_glossary_of_finishing_terms.html

Crazing

(R paienjenis de crapaturi) Network of surface cracks (BS 3446). Used generally to describe surface cracking of concrete surfaces and paint film. Also used specifically to describe the fine network cracking of ceramic glazes by, for example, differential thermal expansion between glaze and tile body, or moisture expansion of the body
Found on http://www.angelfire.com/biz/BuildingPathology/BldngPathGlsry.html

crazing

A network of checks or cracks appearing on the surface
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21115

Crazing

Minute surface pattern cracks in mortar or concrete due to unequal shrinkage or contraction on drying or cooling.
Found on http://www.pavement.com/glossary/A.html

Crazing

Crazing denotes a surface covered in fine cracks giving the appearance of a small pattern. The term is encountered with regard to glazed materials such as pots, and also in the painting and decorating trades.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AC1.HTM

CRAZING

Small, interlacing cracks on surface of finish.
Found on http://www.goldenglowpaints.com/Articles/GeneralArticles/GLOSSARYTERMS.htm

Crazing

Microscopic fissures, developed from age, in the varnish layer, distorting light refraction which affects the appearance of haze. In extreme instances the varnish layer becomes opaque.
Found on http://www.art-conservation.org/GLOSS_Paint.htm

crazing

A fine network of cracks on a ceramic body. Caused by differences in cooling temperature rates of the glaze and the caramic body.
Found on http://www.antique-marks.com/antique-terms-c.html

CRAZING

Small, interlacing cracks on surface of finish.
Found on http://www.goldenglowpaints.com/Articles/GeneralArticles/GLOSSARYTERMS.htm

Crazing

Crazing looks like a network of fine cracks on the surface of a material, for example in a glaze layer. Crazing is a phenomenon that frequently precedes fracture in some glassy thermoplastic polymers. Crazing occurs in regions of high hydrostatic tension, or in regions of very localized yielding, which leads to the formation of interpenetrating mi
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crazing

Crazing

The tendency of Opals to crack when exposed to heat ordrying air. Also known as Checking.
Found on http://www.jewelry-design-gemstone.com/gemstone-words-glossary.html

Crazing

Surface deterioration of a shingle by the formation of a pattern of fine hairline cracks.
Found on http://www.rbroof.com/glossary-of-terms
No exact match found