coif

[n] - a skullcap worn by nuns under a veil or by soldiers under a hood of mail or formerly by British sergeants-at-law 2. [v] - cover with a coif
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=coif

Coif

cap or under-helmet made of MAIL
Found on http://www.msgb.co.uk/glossary.html

Coif

Coif (koif) noun [ Old French coife , French coiffe , Late Latin cofea , cuphia , from Old High German kuppa , kuppha , miter, perhaps from Latin cupa tub. See Cup , noun ; but confer also Cop , Cuff the
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/106

Coif

Coif (koif) transitive verb [ Confer French coiffer .] To cover or dress with, or as with, a coif. « And coif me, where I'm bald, with flowers. J. G. Cooper. »
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/106

coif

noun a skullcap worn by nuns under a veil or by soldiers under a hood of mail or formerly by British sergeants-at-law
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=coif

coif

verb cover with a coif
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=coif

Coif

• (n.) A close-fitting cap covering the sides of the head, like a small hood without a cape. • (n.) An official headdress, such as that worn by certain judges in England. • (v. t.) To cover or dress with, or as with, a coif. • (n.) A cap.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/coif/

coif

close-fitting cap of white linen that covered the ears and was tied with strings under the chin, like a baby`s bonnet. It appeared at the end of the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/106

coif

coif 1. A cap, a headdress. 2. A tight-fitting cap worn under a veil, as by nuns; a 'skullcap' worn by nuns under a veil. 3. Any of various hoodlike caps, varying through the centuries in shape and purpose, worn by men and women. 4. A white skullcap formerly worn by English lawyers. 5. A heavy skullcap of steel or leather, formerly worn under a
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/3449/

Coif

A coif (f) is a close fitting cap that covers the top, back, and sides of the head. == History == Coifs were worn by all classes in England and Scotland from the Middle Ages to the early seventeenth century (and later as an old-fashioned cap for countrywomen and young children). Tudor (later Stewart in Scotland) and earlier coifs are usually made
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coif

Coif

A coif was a steel cap worn by knights, and later the name was used for the lawn hood or cap won by sergeants-at-law.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/FC.HTM

Coif

A coif is a close-fitting cap. During the Middle Ages a coif was worn under a veil by women and by knights beneath a chain-mail hood. Today coifs are worn by nuns.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/PC.HTM

Coif

Head-cover worn by nuns as part of their habit, often with long veils.
Found on http://www.hatsuk.com/hatsuk/hatsukhtml/bible/glossary.htm

coif

iron skull-cap
Found on http://phrontistery.info/c.html
No exact match found