Caboose

Ca·boose' (kȧ*bōs') noun [ Confer Dutch kabuis , kombuis , Danish kabys , Swedish kabysa , German kabuse a little room or hut. The First part of the word seems to be allied to W. cab cabin, booth. Confer Cabin .] [ Written also cambo
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/2

Caboose

• (n.) A car used on freight or construction trains for brakemen, workmen, etc.; a tool car. • (n.) A house on deck, where the cooking is done; -- commonly called the galley.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/caboose/

caboose

(from the article `railroad`) One type of vehicle that is fast disappearing in North America and virtually extinct in Europe is the caboose, or brake-van. With modern air-braking ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/2

Caboose

[Sugar Ray song] Reproduction from the Śrītattvanidhi ("The Illustrious Treasure of Realities"), an iconographic treatise compiled in the 19th century in Karnataka, India, by order of the then Maharaja of Mysore, Krishnaraja Wodeyar III (b. 1794 - d. 1868). ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caboose_(Sugar_Ray_song)

Caboose

US term for brake van
Found on http://www.railway-technical.com/newglos.shtml

Caboose

Caboose is British slang for a prison.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZC.HTM

Caboose

Caboose is British slang for a prison.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZC.HTM

Caboose

A caboose is a manned American rail transport vehicle coupled at the end of a freight train. Cabooses were once used on nearly every freight train. Until the 1980s, laws in the United States and Canada required that all freight trains had a caboose and a full crew, for safety. Technology eventually advanced such that the railroads, in an effort to
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caboose

Caboose

a small ship's kitchen, or galley on deck.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_nautical_terms

Caboose

[ship`s galley] Caboose (also camboose, coboose, cubboos derived from the Dutch kombuis) is a term used for a small ship`s kitchen, or galley on deck. At one time a caboose related to a smaller kitchen on a merchantman ship, while on a larger warship it was called a galley. William Falconer`s 1780 A Universal Dictionary of the Marine descri
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caboose_(ship`s_galley)

Caboose

a small ship's kitchen, or galley on deck.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_nautical_terms
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