Bourgeoisie

Bour·geoi·sie' noun [ French] The French middle class, particularly such as are concerned in, or dependent on, trade.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/86

Bourgeoisie

• (n.) The French middle class, particularly such as are concerned in, or dependent on, trade.
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bourgeoisie

the social order that is dominated by the so-called middle class. In social and political theory, the notion of the bourgeoisie was largely a ... [15 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/100

bourgeoisie

bourgeoisie (boorzhwäzē') , originally the name for the inhabitants of walled towns in medieval France; as artisans and craftsmen, the bourgeoisie occupied a socioeconomic position between the peasants and the landlords in the countryside. The term was extended to include the middle c...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0808528.html

Bourgeoisie

(Fr.) In its strict sense in the theory of historical materialism (q.v.) the class of urban, commercial, banking, manufacturing and shipping entrepreneurs which, at the close of the middle ages was strong enough, by virtue of its command of developing technics, to challenge the economic power of the predominantly rural and agricultural (manorial) ....
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Bourgeoisie

Bourgeoisie was a name applied to a certain class in France, in contradistinction to the nobility and clergy as well as to the working-classes. It thus included all those who did not belong to the nobility or clergy, and yet occupied an independent position, from financiers and heads of great mercantile establishments at the one end to master trade...
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bourgeoisie

The social class above the workers and peasants, and below the nobility; the middle class. `Bourgeoisie` (and bourgeois) has also acquired a contemptuous sense, implying commonplace, philistine respectability. By socialists it is applied to the whole propertied class, as distinct from the proletariat
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0017955.html

Bourgeoisie

Bourgeoisie (Eng.: iː; buʁʒwazi) is a word from the French language, used in the fields of political economy, political philosophy, sociology, and history, which originally denoted the wealthy stratum of the middle class that originated during the latter part of the Middle Ages (AD 500–1500). The utilization and specific application of the wo...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bourgeoisie

Bourgeoisie

The capitalist class (see capitalism below) that came to be known as the middle class, between the aristocracy and the working class. A new middle class of merchants and businessmen prospered throughout Europe from the 16th century, and especially in Britain, which Napoleon described as a 'nation of shopkeepers'. The term 'bourgeois' is used deroga...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_history

bourgeoisie

A French term that refers the wealthy middle-class, particularly capitalists who make profit from production or trade. In revolutionary France, the bourgeoisie was the wealthiest stratum of the Third Estate.
Found on http://alphahistory.com/frenchrevolution/french-revolution-glossary/

Bourgeoisie

In Marxist terms, the middle class
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Bourgeoisie

(French, 'city-dwelling') The French term bourgeoisie is a noun referring to the non-aristocratic mi
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385
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