biomechanics

Type: Term Pronunciation: bī′ō-me-kan′iks Definitions: 1. The science concerned with the action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=10307

Biomechanics

[Meyerhold] Biomechanics was a system of actor training developed by Vsevolod Meyerhold. Its purpose was to widen the emotional potential of a theater piece and express thoughts and ideas that could not be easily presented through the naturalistic theater of the period. The techniques of Biomechanics were developed during the rehearsals of ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biomechanics_(Meyerhold)

Biomechanics

the study of the mechanics of muscular activity.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20944

biomechanics

<study> The study of the body in terms of its mechanical structure and properties. Locomotion of the body is one of the more important things to which the mechanical laws are applied for study. ... (21 Mar 1998) ...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?biomechanics

biomechanics

(bi″o-mә-kanĀ“iks) the application of mechanical laws to living structures. See also kinesiology.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

biomechanics

antirealistic system of dramatic production developed in the Soviet Union in the early 1920s by the avant-garde director Vsevolod Meyerhold. ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/67

biomechanics

biomechanics, biomechanical 1. The science concerned with the action of forces, internal or external, on the living body. 2. The study of the mechanical laws relating to the movement or structure of living organisms. 3. The study of body movements and of the forces acting on the musculoskeletal system. 4. The application of mechanics to the stru...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/3623/

biomechanics

Application of mechanical engineering principles and techniques in the field of medicine and surgery, studying natural structures to improve those produced by humans. For example, mother-of-pearl is structurally superior to glass fibre, and deer antlers have outstanding durability because they are composed of microscopic fibres. Such natura...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0033922.html

Biomechanics

Study of the function of the body in relation to movement; especially important for repetitive movement sports like running; poor biomechanics can lead to injury
Found on http://www.howtobefit.com/glossary-of-running.htm

Biomechanics

Biomechanics is the study of the structure and function of biological systems such as humans, animals, plants, organs, and cells by means of the methods of mechanics. ==Word history== The word `biomechanics` (1899) and the related `biomechanical` (1856) were coined by Nikolai Bernstein{citation needed|date=October 2013} from the Ancient Greek ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biomechanics

Biomechanics

Science concerned with the internal and external forces acting on a human body and the effects produced by these forces.
Found on http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/glossam.htm

Biomechanics

The study of the mechanics of a part or function of a living body
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Health/Fitness/
No exact match found