Accost

Ac·cost' (#; 115) transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Accosted ; present participle & verbal noun Accosting .] [ French accoster , Late Latin accostare to bring side by side; Latin ad + costa rib, ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/15

Accost

Ac·cost' intransitive verb To adjoin; to lie alongside. [ Obsolete] 'The shores which to the sea accost .' Spenser.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/15

Accost

Ac·cost' noun Address; greeting. [ R.] J. Morley.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/15

accost

1. To join side to side; to border; hence, to sail along the coast or side of. 'So much [of Lapland] as accosts the sea.' ... 2. To approach; to make up to. ... 3. To speak to first; to address; to greet. 'Him, Satan thus accosts.' ... Origin: F. Accoster, LL. Accostare to bring side by side; L. Ad + costa rib, side. See Coast, and cf. Accoast. ......
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?accost

accost

verb speak to someone
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=accost

Accost

• (v. t.) To join side to side; to border; hence, to sail along the coast or side of. • (v. t.) To approach; to make up to. • (v. t.) To speak to first; to address; to greet. • (v. i.) To adjoin; to lie alongside. • (n.) Address; greeting.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/accost/

accost

accost 1. To approach and stop someone in order to speak; especially, in an aggressive, insistent, or suggestive way. 2. Etymology: via French and ultimately from Latin accostare, 'to adjoin'; from costa, 'rib, side' (source of English coast). The essential sense is 'to be alongside'. From this, or from the French derivative accoster, we have mad...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/551/
No exact match found