Abbess

Abbess was 16th to 19th century slang for the mistress of a brothel.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZA.HTM

abbess

[n] - the superior of a group of nuns
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=abbess

abbess

Female superior of a nunnery (usually Benedictine) which has canonical status as an abbey. She is usually elected by the sisters subject to the approval of the bishop. In the Rom ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Abbess

Ab'bess (ăb'bĕs) noun [ Old French abaesse , abeesse , French abbesse , Latin abbatissa , fem. of abbas , abbatis , abbot. See Abbot .] A female superior or governess of a nunnery, or convent of nuns, having the same authority over the nuns
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/2

abbess

mother superior noun the superior of a group of nuns
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=abbess

Abbess

• (n.) A female superior or governess of a nunnery, or convent of nuns, having the same authority over the nuns which the abbots have over the monks. See Abbey.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/abbess/

abbess

the title of a superior of certain communities of nuns following the Benedictine Rule, of convents of the Second Order of St. Francis (Poor Clares), ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/2

Abbess

Abbess was 16th to 19th century slang for the mistress of a brothel.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZA.HTM

Abbess

An abbess (Latin abbatissa, feminine form of abbas, abbot) is the female superior, or mother superior, of a community of nuns, often an abbey. In the Catholic Church (both the Latin Rite and Eastern Catholic), Eastern Orthodox, Coptic and Anglican abbeys, the mode of election, position, rights, and authority of an abbess correspond generally with
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abbess

Abbess

An Abbess is the female superior of a community of nuns in certain religious orders. An abbess has administrative jurisdiction equivalent to that of the abbot of a monastery but does not exercise the rights and duties of the priesthood. The title dates from the 6th century. Most of the original secular privileges of the position, such as membership
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/CXA.HTM
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