Voltage

Potential difference between two electrodes; a measure of the chemical potential for a redox reaction to occur.
Found on http://home.nas.net/~dbc/cic_hamilton/dictionary/a.html

Voltage

The value of an electromotive force or potential difference expressed in volts.
Found on http://www.windmill.co.uk/glossary.html

voltage

[n] - the rate at which energy is drawn from a source that produces a flow of electricity in a circuit
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=voltage

Voltage

The electrical force pushing electrons to obtain electrical current.
Found on http://www.testing1212.co.uk/a.htm

Voltage

See Pressure.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20474

Voltage

Voltage is an electrical concept. In circuits, voltage is a measure of the electrical energy available between two points. Voltage must be measured between two points in a circuit - e.g. 'The voltage between point X and point Y is 3 volts'. Voltages are measured using a device called a voltmeter. It is not necessary to break into a circuit in orde
Found on http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/computing/MainPage/SecDepts/Physics/Resources

Voltage

Voltage is what is known as the 'potential difference' between two points, in electronics meaning the two points between which a flow of electrical current can be carried. It is this potential difference that helps to create Electromotive Force (EMF) that can move electrons, or other charge carriers between two points. It's unit of measurement is t
Found on http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/music%20tech%20glossary/Music%20Tech%20Gl

Voltage

A potential difference causes current to flow in a circuit, no voltage no current. See also: Differential Voltage, Open Circuit Voltage, Volt, Voltmeter.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/v/o/voltage/source.html

Voltage

Potential difference between two electrodes, a measure of the chemical potential for a redox reaction to occur.
Found on http://www.allchemicals.info/index/action/detail/keyword/V/id/1059585547.ph

voltage

(V) A measured electric potential, in volts.
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/v.shtml

Voltage

the electrical pressure (electromotive force) that makes current flow through a conductor.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/1623-Voltage

Voltage

An electrical potential which can be measured in volts.
Found on http://www.flowmeterdirectory.com/flowmeter_technical_glossary/flowmeter_te

Voltage

The driving force behind the flow of electricity somewhat like pressure is in a water pipe. Most homes are wired with '110' and '220' volt lines. The '110' volt power is used for lighting and most of the other circuits. The '220' volt power is usually used for the kitchen stove, water heater and dryer. (The terms '110' and '220' volts are a short
Found on http://www.rookinspections.com/glossary/glossaryv.shtml

Voltage

Vol'tage noun (Electricity) Electric potential or potential difference, expressed in volts.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/V/35

voltage

<physics> Electric potential or potential difference, expressed in volts. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?voltage

voltage

emf noun the rate at which energy is drawn from a source that produces a flow of electricity in a circuit; expressed in volts
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=voltage

voltage

(vōl´tәj) electromotive force measured in volts.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Voltage

• (n.) Electric potential or potential difference, expressed in volts.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/voltage/

Voltage

The amount of electromotive force, measured in volts, that exists between two points.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21690

Voltage

Voltage, otherwise known as electrical potential difference or electric tension (denoted ∆V and measured in volts, or joules per coulomb) is the potential difference between two points — or the difference in electric potential energy per unit charge between two points. Voltage is equal to the work which would have to be done, per unit charge,
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voltage

Voltage

A measure of electrical potential. Most homes are wired with 110 and 220 volt lines. The 110 volt power is used for lighting and most of the other circuits. The 220 volt power is usually used for the kitchen range, hot water heater and dryer.
Found on http://www.homebuildingmanual.com/Glossary.htm

VOLTAGE

The driving force behind the flow of electricity somewhat like pressure is in a water pipe.
Found on http://www.proofrock.com/glossary.html

Voltage

A measure of electrical potential. If we think of electrical measurements in terms of waterfalls then - Multnoma Fall has high voltage and low amperage (very fast water and low volume). The Columbia River would have low voltage and very high amperage (low speed and very high volume).
Found on http://www.soundhome.com/glossary

voltage

scalar quantity equal to the line integral of the electric field strength E along a specific path linking two points a and b: where ra and rb are the position vectors for a and b, respectively, and dr is the vector line element NOTE 1 - In the case of an irrotational field strength, the voltage is indep...
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=121-11-27

Voltage

The amount of electromotive force, measured in volts, that exists between two points.
Found on http://www.electromn.com/glossary/v.htm
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