spillover

[n] - (economics) any indirect effect of public expenditure
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=spillover

spillover

noun (economics) any indirect effect of public expenditure
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=spillover

spillover

(from the article `price system`) Even when prices are freely established by competition, there is a class of economic relationships called `externalities` not efficiently controlled ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/140

spillover

(from the article `orographic precipitation`) ...orographic clouds form and serve as the source of the precipitation, most of which falls upwind of the mountain ridge. Some also falls a short ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/140

Spillover

A positive externality. The term is often used to refer to the transmission of an advanced technology from a foreign-owned firm (thus FDI) to domestic firms.
Found on http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alandear/glossary/s.html

spillover

What spillover means is that rabies viral variant isolated from a rabid animal will be the variant from the terrestrial wildlife reservoir in that area. That is why if you have a rabid raccoon in Montana it will be spill over from a skunk because that is the only wildlife reservoir that maintains the virus in that area.
Found on http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/glossary/glossary.asp

Spillover

[imaging] Spillover effect can be defined as an apparent gain in activity for small objects or regions, as opposed to the partial volume effect. It occurs often in biological imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) because of their limited spatial resolution. Altho...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spillover_(imaging)
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