speculum

Latin, meaning: mirror.
Found on http://archives.nd.edu/sss.htm

speculum

[n] - a mirror (especially one made of polished metal) for use in an optical instrument 2. [n] - a medical instrument for dilating a bodily passage or cavity in order to examine the interior
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=speculum

Speculum

A copper-tin alloy with 33 to 45% of tin that has very high optical reflectivity when polished. Used in Gaul and Britain during the period around the time of Caesar's invasion.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/s/p/speculum/source.html

Speculum

Instrument used to hold the vagina open during an internal examination. Enables the doctor to see the cervix clearly.
Found on http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/utilities/glossary/index.htm?search=s

Speculum

an instrument that holds an opening of the body open so that an examination can be performed or a sample can be taken
Found on http://www.medichecks.com/glossary.cfm?ltr=S

Speculum

Speculum: An instrument used to widen an opening to look within a passage or a cavity. For example, a speculum may be used to widen the opening of the vagina so that the cervix is more easily visible. Other examples include the nasal speculum to look up into the nostrils and the ear speculum to look within the ear canal at the ear drum. The term 's...
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=5522

Speculum

Spec'u·lum noun ; plural Latin Specula , English Speculum . [ Latin , from specere to look, behold. See Spy .] 1. A mirror, or looking-glass; especially, a metal mirror, as in Greek and Roman archæology. 2. A reflector of polished metal, especiall...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/158

speculum

Origin: L, fr. Specere to look, behold. See Spy. ... 1. A mirror, or looking-glass; especially, a metal mirror, as in Greek and Roman archaeology. ... 2. A reflector of polished metal, especially one used in reflecting telescopes. See Speculum metal, below. ... 3. <surgery> An instrument for dilating certain passages of the body, and throwing...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?speculum

speculum

noun a medical instrument for dilating a bodily passage or cavity in order to examine the interior
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=speculum

speculum

(spek´u-lәm) an instrument for opening or distending a body orifice or cavity to permit visual inspection. bivalve speculum one with two blades that are adjustable. rectal speculum one that enlarges the diameter of the rectum for an examination. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Speculum

• (n.) A bright and lustrous patch of color found on the wings of ducks and some other birds. It is usually situated on the distal portions of the secondary quills, and is much more brilliant in the adult male than in the female. • (n.) A reflector of polished metal, especially one used in reflecting telescopes. See Speculum metal, below....
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/speculum/

speculum

A brittle white alloy of two parts copper to one part tin that takes a very high polish and was used for telescope mirrors until the late nineteenth century. The manufacture of speculum mirrors reached its apex with William Parsons, third Earl of Rosse, who managed to produce several 36-inch (91-cm)...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/S/speculum.html

Speculum

A plastic or metal instrument that doctors use to separate the walls of the vagina during an internal exam. The vagina, uterus and cervix are easily seen once the speculum is in place.
Found on http://www.pregnology.com/AZ/S/4

Speculum

(Lat. mirror) In ordinary language a mirror. Special meanings in optics, astronomy, surgery, and in ornithology. In medieval philosophy, mind is the speculum of nature and God. -- V F.
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/s.html

Speculum

A speculum is an instrument for temporarily stretching a cavity of the body so that a physician may examine the deeper parts.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ES.HTM

speculum

Type: Term Pronunciation: spek′yū-lŭm, -lă Definitions: 1. An instrument for exposing the opening of any canal or cavity to facilitate inspection of its interior.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=83388

speculum

An instrument used to widen an opening of the body to make it easier to look inside.
Found on http://www.cancer.gov/dictionary?expand=S

Speculum

[journal] Speculum: A Journal of Medieval Studies is a quarterly academic journal published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Medieval Academy of America. It was established in 1926. The journal`s primary focus is on the time period from 500-1500 in Western Europe, but also on related subjects such as Byzantine, Hebrew, Arabic,...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speculum_(journal)

Speculum

[medical] A speculum (Latin for `mirror`; plural specula or speculums) is a medical tool for investigating body orifices, with a form dependent on the orifice for which it is designed. In old texts, the speculum may also be referred to as a diopter or dioptra. Like an endoscope, a speculum allows entry into a body cavity; endoscopes, howeve...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speculum_(medical)

Speculum

An iridescent patch of color on the wings of certain ducks and other birds (Morris 1992
Found on http://imnh.isu.edu/digitalatlas/bio/glsry.htm

Speculum

Mirror-like patch found on the petals of some orchids
Found on http://www.first-nature.com/flowers/~wildflower-glossary.php

Speculum

A device used to spread a woman's vaginal
Found on http://www.whattoexpect.com/pregnancy/glossary/s.aspx

Speculum

Distinctively pigmented area on the upper surface of the secondaries, particularly in dabbling ducks (such as American Black Duck).
Found on http://birds.audubon.org/birdid/resources/glossary

Speculum

Area of colour on secondary feathers of wings.
Found on http://www.kolkatabirds.com/glossary.htm

Speculum

Iridescent, reflective dorsal patch on the secondaries of a duck's wing, best seen in flight; contrasts with the rest of the wing.
Found on http://www.jacanaent.com/PhotoLib/Glossary.htm
No exact match found