Saker

Sa'ker (sā'kẽr) noun [ French sacre (cf. Italian sagro , Spanish & Portuguese sacre ), either from Latin sacer sacred, holy, as a translation of Greek 'ie`rax falcon, from 'iero`s holy, or more probably from Arabic çaqr hawk.] [
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/7

saker

1. <zoology> A falcon (Falco sacer) native of Southern Europe and Asia, closely resembling the lanner. ... The female is called chargh, and the male charghela, or sakeret. ... The peregrine falcon. ... 2. A small piece of artillery. 'On the bastions were planted culverins and sakers.' (Macaulay) 'The culverins and sakers showing their deadly
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?saker

Saker

• (n.) A small piece of artillery. • (n.) The peregrine falcon. • (n.) A falcon (Falco sacer) native of Southern Europe and Asia, closely resembling the lanner.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/saker/

saker

(from the article `falconry`) ...and broadwings. The hawks in each of these three categories display different traits because of adaptation to their hunting environments and prey. ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/13

Saker

[cannon] The saker was a medium cannon slightly smaller than a culverin developed during the early 16th century and often used by the English. It was named after the Saker Falcon, a large falconry bird native to the Middle East. A saker`s barrel was approximately 9.5 ft (2.9m) long, had a calibre of 3.25 inches (8.26 cm) and weighed approxi
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saker_(cannon)

Saker

Saker is an old military term for a small piece of artillery.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/FS.HTM

Saker

The saker was a British cannon with a 3.5-inch bore firing a 5.5 lb shot.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/FYS.HTM
No exact match found