Plique-à-jour

Plique-à-jour (French for `letting in daylight`) is a vitreous enamelling technique where the enamel is applied in cells, similar to cloisonné, but with no backing in the final product, so light can shine through the transparent or translucent enamel. It is in effect a miniature version of stained-glass and is considered very challenging techn.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plique-à-jour

Plique-a-jour

A form of cloisonné in which the enamel in the cells has no backing, producing a translucent effect. This technique was used to good effect by Rene' Lalique and others during the Art Nouveau period to depict dragonfly wings and other translucent objects.
Found on http://www.indygem.com/pages/Glossary-of-Terms.html

plique-à-jour

(French: `open to light`), in the decorative arts, technique producing translucent enamels held in an open framework made by soldering individual ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/80

plique-a-jour

Wire is soldered onto a metal base, or former, to form cells which are then filled with translucent enamel colours. After firing, the base is dissolved away to leave a coloured, glass-like shell.
Found on http://www.antique-marks.com/antique-terms-p.html

Plique-a-jour

A form of cloisonn in which the enamel in the cells has no backing, producing a translucent effect. This technique was used to good effect by Rene' Lalique and others during the Art Nouveau period to depict dragonfly wings and other translucent objects.
Found on http://www.daysofelegance.com/glossary.html
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