plasmid

Circular loop of DNA in prokaryotes. Eukaryotic DNA is organized into chromosomes.
Found on http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/glossary_4.html

Plasmid

A circular piece of DNA that exists apart from the chromosome and replicates independently of it. Bacterial plasmids carry information that renders the bacteria resistant to antibiotics. Plasmids are often used in genetic engineering to carry desired genes into organisms.
Found on http://www.epa.gov/OCEPAterms/

plasmid

In many types of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell: a linear or covalently closed circular molecule of DNA, (distinct from chromosomal DNA, mtDNA, ctDNA, or kDNA and commonly dispensable to the cell), that can replicate autonomously (i.e., independently of other replicons).
Found on http://ppathw3.cals.cornell.edu/glossary/Defs_P.htm

plasmid

A circular piece of DNA found outside the chromosome in bacteria. Plasmids are the principle tool for inserting new genetic information into microbes or plants.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Plasmid

A self-replicating piece of DNA not essential for survival which is found outside the chromosomes of an organism. Typically, plasmids are found in bacteria are used in biotechnology as cloning vectors to introduce foreign DNA into a host cell.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Plasmid

a circular piece of DNA found in the cell cytoplasm of bacteria which is able to reproduce itself independently of it host. Plasmids may transmit a resistance to antibiotics from one bacteria to another. They are of great importance in techniques using for recombinant DNA.
Found on http://www.eclipse.co.uk/moordent/page5.html

plasmid

[n] - a small cellular inclusion consisting of a ring of DNA that is not in a chromosome but is capable of autonomous replication
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=plasmid

plasmid

(Learning Modules / Biology / DNA / Glossary) Small loop of DNA which bacteria can transfer to one another, thereby taking on new characteristics e.g. antibiotic resistance. Can also be exploited by genetic engineers who use plasmids to 'deliver' new genes into bacteria for their own purposes.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Plasmid

A piece of parasitic genetic material found in a cell that can propagate itself using the cell's energetic resources
Found on http://www.i-sis.org.uk/Glossary.php

Plasmid

Plasmid: A circle of DNA that is self-replicating (autonomously replicating) and distinct from the normal genome of bacteria. A plasmid contains genes that as a rule are not essential to the growth or survival of the cell. Some plasmids can integrate into the host genome, can be artificially constructed in the laboratory, and serve as cloning vecto
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=4938

plasmid

(= episome) A small, independently-replicating, piece of cytoplasmic DNA that can be transferred from one organism to another. Linear or circular DNA molecules found in both pro- and eukaryotes capable of autonomous replication. ‘Stringent` plasmids occur at low copy number in cells, ‘relaxed` plasmids at high copy number, ca 10-30. Pla
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

plasmid

<molecular biology> A small, independently replicating, piece of extrachromosomal cytoplasmic DNA that can be transferred from one organism to another. Linear or circular DNA molecules found in both pro and eukaryotes capable of autonomous replication. ... Stringent plasmids occur at low copy number in cells, relaxed plasmids at high copy num
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?plasmid

plasmid

noun a small cellular inclusion consisting of a ring of DNA that is not in a chromosome but is capable of autonomous replication
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=plasmid

plasmid

(plaz´mid) an extrachromosomal self-replicating structure found in bacterial cells that carries genes for a variety of functions not essential for cell growth. Plasmids consist of cyclic double-stranded DNA molecules, replicating independently of the chromosomes and transmitting through successive cell divisions g...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Plasmid

• (n.) A piece of DNA, usually circular, functioning as part of the genetic material of a cell, not integrated with the chromosome and replicating independently of the chromosome, but transferred, like the chromosome, to subsequent generations. In bacteria, plasmids often carry the genes for antibiotic resistance; they are exploited in genetic
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/plasmid/

plasmid

in microbiology, an extrachromosomal genetic element that occurs in many bacterial strains. Plasmids are circular deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) ... [8 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/77

plasmid

Autonomously replicating, extrachromosomal circular DNA molecules, distinct from the normal bacterial genome and nonessential for cell survival under nonselective conditions. Some plasmids are capable of integrating into the host genome. A number of artificially constructed plasmids are used as cloning vectors.
Found on http://linkage.rockefeller.edu/wli/glossary/genetics.html

Plasmid

Autonomously replicating extra-chromosomal circular DNA molecules, distinct from the normal bacterial genome and nonessential for cell survival under nonselective conditions. Some plasmids are capable of integrating into the host genome. A number of artificially constructed plasmids are used as cloning vectors.
Found on http://www.ornl.gov/sci/techresources/Human_Genome/glossary/glossary.shtml

plasmid

A supercoiled plasmid is the predominant in vivo form in which the plasmid is coiled around histone-like proteins. Supporting proteins are stripped away during extraction from the bacterial cell, causing the plasmid molecule to supercoil around itself in vitro. Photo credit: Stanley Maloy, Director,...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/P/plasmid.html

plasmid

Type: Term Pronunciation: plaz′mid Definitions: 1. A genetic particle physically separate from the chromosome of the host cell (chiefly bacterial) that can function and replicate stably and usually confer some advantage to the host cell; not essential to the cell's basic functioning. Synonyms: extrachromosomal element, extrachromosomal geneti
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=69446

plasmid

Small, mobile piece of DNA found in bacteria that, for example, confers antibiotic resistance, used in genetic engineering. Plasmids are separate from the bacterial chromosome but still multiply during cell growth. Their size ranges from 3% to 20% of the size of the chromosome. Some plasmids carry `fertility genes` that enable the...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0026145.html

Plasmid

A plasmid is a small DNA molecule that is physically separate from, and can replicate independently of, chromosomal DNA within a cell. Most commonly found as small circular, double-stranded DNA molecules in bacteria, plasmids are sometimes present in archaea and eukaryotic organisms. In nature, plasmids carry genes that may benefit survival of the
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plasmid

Plasmid

Autonomously replicating extra-chromosomal circular dna molecules, distinct from the normal bacteria
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22391

Plasmid

Autonomously replicating, extrachromosomal circular dna molecules, distinct from the normal bacteria
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22391

Plasmid

Autonomously replicating extra-chromosomal circular dna molecules, distinct from the normal bacteria
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22391
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