Methemoglobin

Methemoglobin: A particular type of hemoglobin that is altered so that it is useless for carrying oxygen and delivering it to tissues throughout the human body. Since hemoglobin is the key carrier of oxygen in the blood, its wholesale replacement by methemoglobin can cause cyanosis (a slate gray-blueness) due to lack of oxygen. A small amount of me
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methemoglobin

Haemoglobin in a form incapable of carrying oxygen. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...
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methemoglobin

(met-heĀ“mo-glo″bin) a pigment formed in the blood from hemoglobin by oxidation of the iron atom from the ferrous to the ferric state; it does not function as an oxygen carrier. A small amount is found in the blood normally, but injury or toxic agents cause more hemoglobin to change to methemoglobin (see methemoglo...
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methemoglobin

(from the article `blood`) ...ways. The iron of hemoglobin is normally in the reduced or ferrous state, in both oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. If the iron itself becomes ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/80

methemoglobin

(metHb) Type: Term Pronunciation: met-hē′mō-glō′bin Definitions: 1. A transformation product of oxyhemoglobin resulting from the oxidation of the normal Fe2+ to Fe3+, a process that converts heme to hematin; because methemoglobin contains water in firm union with ferric iron, it is chemically different from oxyhemo
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methemoglobin

A form of hemoglobin found in the blood in small amounts. Unlike normal hemoglobin, methemoglobin cannot carry oxygen. Injury or certain drugs, chemicals, or foods may cause a higher-than-normal amount of methemoglobin to be made. This causes a condition called methemoglobinemia.
Found on http://www.cancer.gov/dictionary?expand=M
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