Lignin

The cross-linked polymer of linked benzene rings that makes hardwood hard. It is an important structural material for most land plants, and is usually found mixed in with cellulose. Partial digestion of lignin by enzymes (completely different from the ones that break down cellulose) gives complex materials called humic and fulvic acids. These are t
Found on http://www.kcpc.usyd.edu.au/discovery/glossary-all.html

Lignin

A complex amorphous substance that, in association with cellulose, causes the thickening of xylem vessels and plant cell walls and thereby forms wood or woody parts.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

lignin

(Green plants as organisms) a hard cellulose-like substance which gives rigidity to plant tissues
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

lignin

[n] - a complex polymer
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=lignin

Lignin

A naturally occurring acid substance in wood that breaks down over time. Paper with lignin is not suitable for archival scrapbooking projects.
Found on http://www.scrapdirectory.co.uk/scrapbook-pages-glossary.htm

Lignin

Substance in trees that holds cellulose fibres together. Free sheet has most lignin removed; groundwood paper contains lignin.
Found on http://www.tso.co.uk/solutions/publishingsolutions/printproduction/printglo

Lignin

The natural, glue-like substance that holds together the cellulose fibers of wood plants. Lignin that is left in pulp causes paper to age and yellow over time.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20829

Lignin

Non-cellulose material found in wood and other cellulose plants. In the groundwood methods of pulp production the lignin is softened but not removed, and the papers made from groundwood pulp are weaker and more inclined to discolour on exposure to the atmosphere. In the chemical pulp making process most of the lignin is dissolved and the resulting
Found on http://www.roberthorne.co.uk/contact/glossary/

Lignin

Complex organic material deposited within the cell walls of plants associated with cellulose, especially in wood and fibers.
Found on http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/Townsend/Glossary/GlossaryL.html

lignin

Complex polymer of phenylpropanoid subunits, laid down in the walls of plant cells such as xylem vessels and sclerenchyma. Imparts considerable strength to the wall, and also protects it against degradation by microorganisms. It is also laid down as a defence reaction against pathogenic attack, as part of the hypersensitive response of plants.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Lignin

Lig'nin (lĭg'nĭn) noun [ Latin lignum wood: confer French lignine .] (Botany) A substance characterizing wood cells and differing from cellulose in its conduct with certain chemical reagents. » Recent authors have distinguished four forms of this substance, namin
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/41

lignin

<plant biology> Organic substance which act as a binder for the cellulose fibres in wood and certain plants and adds strength and stiffness to the cell walls. ... The chemical structure of lignin is composed of a complex polymer of phenylpropanoid subunits, laid down in the walls of plant cells such as xylem vessels and sclerenchyma. It impar
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?lignin

lignin

noun a complex polymer; the chief constituent of wood other than carbohydrates; binds to cellulose fibers to harden and strengthen cell walls of plants
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=lignin

Lignin

• (n.) A substance characterizing wood cells and differing from cellulose in its conduct with certain chemical reagents.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/lignin/

lignin

complex oxygen-containing organic substance that, with cellulose, forms the chief constituent of wood. It is second only to cellulose as the most ... [6 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/50

lignin

A complex aromatic polymer that forms 25–30% of the wood of trees but is found in all vascular plants, mostly between the cells, but also within the cells, and in the cell walls. It makes vegetables firm and crunchy. It functions to regulate the transport of liquid in the living plant (partly ...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/L/lignin.html

lignin

lignin (lig'nin) , a highly polymerized and complex chemical compound especially common in woody plants. The cellulose walls of the wood become impregnated with lignin, a process called lignification, which greatly increases the strength and hardness of the cell and gives the necessary rigidity ...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0829757.html

lignin

Type: Term Pronunciation: lig′nin Definitions: 1. A random polymer of coniferyl alcohol accompanying cellulose and present in vegetable fiber and wood cells; a source of vanillin (by oxidation of lignin); lignin composition varies with plant species. It is one of the most abundant biopolymers in nature.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=50226

lignin

Naturally occurring substance produced by plants to strengthen their tissues. It is difficult for enzymes to attack lignin, so living organisms cannot digest wood, with the exception of a few specialized fungi and bacteria. Lignin is the essential ingredient of all wood and is, therefore, of great commercial importance. Chemically, lignin is made u
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0007001.html

lignin

A polymer in the secondary cell wall of woody plant cells that helps to strengthen and stiffen the wall; related term lignified.
Found on http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/biobk/biobookglossl.html

Lignin

Lignin or lignen is a complex polymer of aromatic alcohols known as monolignols. It is most commonly derived from wood, and is an integral part of the secondary cell walls of plants and some algae. Lignin was first mentioned in 1813 by the Swiss botanist A. P. de Candolle, who described it as a fibrous, tasteless material, insoluble in water and a
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lignin

Lignin

The phenol -counting colorless substance that is incorporated into the plant cell wall, thereby causing the lignification (lignification, Latin lignum = wood). He is also responsible for the so-called "yellowing" of paper. Lignin is the second most common after the cellulose organic substance on earth. It is also in Oak with a share of ov
Found on http://www.wein-plus.eu/en/Lignin_3.0.13280.html

Lignin

A polymer in the secondary cell wall of woody plant cells that helps to strengthen and stiffen the w
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Science/Biology/

Lignin

a component of the cell walls of plants that occurs naturally, along with cellulose.
Found on http://www.sheep101.info/201/glossary.html

Lignin

A major non-carbohydrate constituent of wood. It binds to cellulose fibres and strengthens and hardens cell walls. (http://www.thefreedictionary.com/lignin)
Found on http://www.abtreegene.com/glossary.html
No exact match found