Legume

The podlike fruit of most members of the mimosa, caesalpinia and legume families (Mimosaceae, Caesalpiniaceae and Fabaceae, respectively), derived from one carpel and usually dehiscent by two sutures.
Found on http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/plants/vascplnt/glossary.htm

legume

A family of plants, including many valuable food and forage species, such as peas, beans, soybeans, peanuts, clovers, and alfalfas. They can convert nitrogen from the air to build up nitrogen in the soil.
Found on http://www.cahe.nmsu.edu/news/aggloss.html

Legume

A plant whose roots form an association with soil borne bacteria that can capture atmospheric nitrogen. A good example of this are soybeans.
Found on http://www.emilycompost.com/garden_glossary.htm

Legume

A member of the pea family that possesses root nodules containing nitrogen-fixing bacteria.
Found on http://filebox.vt.edu/cals/cses/chagedor/glossary.html

Legume

Plant family Leguminoseae, and its members, which contains root nodules and is capable of symbiotic nitrogen fixation with bacteria of the genus Rhizobium e.g. alfalfa, clover, beans, peas.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

legume

[n] - the fruit or seed of any of various bean or pea plants consisting of a two-valved case that splits along both sides when ripe and having the seeds attached to one edge of the valves 2. [n] - an erect or climbing bean or pea plant of the family Leguminosae 3. [n] - the seedpod of a leguminous plant (such as peas or beans or lent
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=legume

Legume

A one-celled fruit that splits along two sutures or seams, e.g. pea.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20901

Legume

Leg'ume (lĕg'um or le*gūm') noun [ French légume , Latin legumen , from legere to gather. So called because they may be gathered without cutting. See Legend .] 1. (Botany) A pod dehiscent into two pieces or valves, and having the seed attached a
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/28

legume

A member of the pea family (Fabaceae) that possesses root nodules containing nitrogen-fixing bacteria. ... (09 Oct 1997) ...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?legume

legume

noun the seedpod of a leguminous plant (such as peas or beans or lentils)
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=legume

legume

leguminous plant noun an erect or climbing bean or pea plant of the family Leguminosae
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=legume

legume

(leg´ūm) (lә-gūm´) any plant of the large family Leguminosae. the pod or fruit of one of these plants, such as a pea or bean; this is an important source of protein in a vegetarian diet.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Legume

• (n.) A pod dehiscent into two pieces or valves, and having the seed attached at one suture, as that of the pea. • (n.) The fruit of leguminous plants, as peas, beans, lupines; pulse.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/legume/

legume

fruit of plants of the order Fabales (q.v.), consisting of the single family Leguminosae, or Fabaceae (peas, beans, vetch, and so on). The dry fruit ... [10 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/31

legume

legume 1. The seedpod of a leguminous plant; such as, peas, beans, or lentils. 2. A seed, pod, or other part of a plant; such as, a pea or bean, used as food. 3. Etymology: 'plant of the group of the pulse family', 1676, from French légume, from Latin legumen, of unknown origin. One suggestion ties it to Latin legere, 'to gather', because they c
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2526/5

Legume

Any of thousands of plant species that have seed pods that split along both sides when ripe. Some of the more common legumes used for human consumption are beans, lentils, peanuts, peas, and soybeans. Others, such as clover and alfalfa, are used as animal feed. Legumes have a unique ability to obtain much or all of their nitrogen requirements from
Found on http://www.epa.gov/agriculture/ag101/dairyglossary.html

Legume

A legume (pron) in botanical writing is a plant in the family Fabaceae (or Leguminosae), or a fruit of these specific plants. A legume fruit is a simple dry fruit that develops from a simple carpel and usually dehisces (opens along a seam) on two sides. A common name for this type of fruit is a pod, although the term "pod" is also applied to a f..
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legume

Legume

Angiosperm plant species that is a member of the Fabaceae (Pea or Bean) family. These plants form symbiotic relationships with specific bacteria species for the purpose of acquiring nitrogen for growth.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/l.html

legume

Also called a pod,a multiseeded dry fruit that liberates its seeds by splitting along two margins, in for example the bean and the pea. See also follicle.
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/L/legume.html

Legume

Vegetables within the pea or pod family that include beans, peas, soybeans, peanuts and lentils. These foods are good sources of protein and fiber and should be eaten during pregnancy as part of a well-balanced diet.
Found on http://www.pregnology.com/AZ/L/2

legume

legume (le'gyOOm, ligyOOm') , common name for any plant of the family Leguminosae, which is called also the pulse, legume, pea, or bean family. The word is often used loosely in the plural for vegetables in general. Botanically, a legume is the characteristic fruit of the pulse family plants...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0829296.html

Legume

A legume is a dry fruit formed from a single carpel and containing one or more seeds, which are shed when mature. It is the characteristic fruit of the Leguminosae family. Legumes split, often explosively, along both sides and the two halves of the fruit move apart to expose the seeds. A special form of the legume is the lomentum.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/BL.HTM

legume

Plant of the family Leguminosae, which has a pod containing dry seeds. The family includes peas, beans, lentils, clover, and alfalfa (lucerne). Legumes are important in agriculture because of their specialized roots, which have nodules containing bacteria capable of fixing nitrogen from the air (see nitrogen fixation) and increasing the fertility o
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0023889.html

Legume

A dry pod-like fruit, belonging to member of the Pea Family, usually dehiscent, opening along longitudinal suture.
Found on http://www.naturehills.com/plant_glossary.xhtml

Legume

The term legume had two closely related meanings in botany, a situation encountered with few botanical common names of useful plants, whereby an applied name could refer to either the plant itself, or to the edible fruit (or useful part).
Found on http://www.fruitsinfo.com/glossary-l.htm
No exact match found