Gorgias

(c. 483-c. 380 BC) Greek orator and sophist from Sicily. He was the subject of a dialogue by Plato, who was deeply critical of his cynical view of the powers of persuasion. Gorgias was renowned for his obscure and...
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Gorgias

(from the article `Greek literature`) ...to be used on both sides in imaginary cases of homicide. In them ideas are expressed concerning bloodguilt and the duty of vengeance. Antiphon`s ... ...to death all male citizens of the small Thracian city of Scione. Isocrates was deeply moved by a desire to see Greece united and at peace and was...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/g/51

Gorgias

(from the article `Plato`) The Gorgias, the Protagoras, and the Meno, like several of the lesser dialogues, give prominence to ethical and political themes. The Gorgias begins ... ...nature was made. In its extreme form the appeal involved the throwing off of all restraints upon self-interest and the desires of the individual ... ......
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/g/51

Gorgias

Gorgias (gôr'jēus) , c.485–c.380 B.C., Greek Sophist. From his native city, Leontini, Sicily, he was sent as an ambassador to Athens, where he settled to teach and practice rhetoric. Gorgias pursued the negative implications of the Eleatic school and asserted: (1) Nothing exist...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/people/A0821325.html

Gorgias

(c. 480 - c. 375 B.C.) Celebrated orator, rhetorician and philosopher from Leontini in Sicily. He was numbered among the leading Sophists. He spent the major part of his long life in Greece, particularly in Athens. The Platonic dialogue bearing his name indicates in some measure the high esteem in which he was held. -- L.E.D.
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/g.html

Gorgias

Gorgias was a Greek orator and sophist. He was born about 480 BC at Leontini in Sicily. When about sixty years of age he was sent as ambassador to Athens where the rest of his life was mostly spent. He was a popular teacher of rhetoric, had many distinguished pupils, and Plato named one of his dialogues after him. He is said to have reached the ext
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/CXGA.HTM
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