Gaia Hypothesis

Named for the Greek Earth goddess Gaea, this hypothesis holds that the Earth should be regarded as a living organism. British biologist James Lovelock first advanced this idea in 1969.
Found on http://www.solarviews.com/eng/terms.htm

Gaia hypothesis

planet earth itself should be seen as a living organism
Found on http://wps.pearsoned.co.uk/wps/media/objects/2143/2195136/glossary/glossary

Gaia hypothesis

(from the article `Green Architecture: Building for the 21st Century`) This `whole Earth` concept also became the basis of Lovelock`s Gaia theory. Named after the Greek goddess of nature, his hypothesis defined the ... ...consciousness and a sense of ecological solidarity. The biocentric principle of interconnectedness was ext...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/g/2

Gaia Hypothesis

The Gaia hypothesis states that the temperature and composition of the Earth's surface are actively controlled by life on the planet. It suggests that if changes in the gas composition, temperature or oxidation state of the Earth are induced by astronomical, biological, lithological, or other perturbations, life responds to these changes by growth ...
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/g.html

Gaia Hypothesis

The idea that life on Earth controls the physical and chemical conditions of the environment. Named after the Greek Earth goddess Gaea, it was originally formulated by James Lovelock and Lynn Margulis in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and has attracted both critics and supporters in large numbers. ...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/G/Gaiahypoth.html

Gaia hypothesis

Theory that the Earth's living and nonliving systems form an inseparable whole that is regulated and kept adapted for life by living organisms themselves. The planet therefore functions as a single organism, or a giant cell. The hypothesis was elaborated by British scientist James Lovelock and first published in 1968
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0023603.html

Gaia hypothesis

The Gaia hypothesis, also known as Gaia theory or Gaia principle, proposes that organisms interact with their inorganic surroundings on Earth to form a self-regulating, complex system that contributes to maintaining the conditions for life on the planet. Topics of interest include how the biosphere and the evolution of life forms affect the stabil...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaia_hypothesis

Gaia hypothesis

an ecological hypothesis that proposes that living and nonliving parts of the earth are a complex interacting system that can be thought of as a single organism.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_environmental_science
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