Deuterium

'Heavy hydrogen', a stable isotope having one proton and one neutron in the nucleus. It occurs in nature as 1 atom to 6500 atoms of normal hydrogen, (Hydrogen atoms contain one proton and no neutrons).

Deuterium

An isotope of hydrogen whose atoms are twice as massive as ordinary hydrogen;deuterion atoms contain both a proton and a neutron in the nucleus.
Found on http://home.nas.net/~dbc/cic_hamilton/dictionary/a.html

deuterium

[n] - an isotope of hydrogen which has one neutron (as opposed to zero neutrons in hydrogen)
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=deuterium

Deuterium

An isotope of hydrogen that contains one neutron and one proton in its nucleus. In normal water a deuterium atom occurs in 1 in 6,500 hydrogen atoms. DiscoveredHarold C. Urey, F. G. Brickwedde, and G. M. Murphy.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/d/e/deuterium/source.html

Deuterium

Heavy hydrogen, a stable isotope having one proton and one neutron in the nucleus. It occurs in nature as 1 atom to 6500 atoms of normal hydrogen, (Hydrogen atoms contain one proton and no neutrons)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20725

Deuterium

An isotope of hydrogen whose atoms are twice as massive as ordinary hydrogen,deuterion atoms contain both a proton and a neutron in the nucleus.
Found on http://www.allchemicals.info/index/action/detail/keyword/D/id/1059559055.ph

deuterium

(D, 2H) An isotope of hydrogen that contains one neutron and one proton in its nucleus.
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/d.shtml

Deuterium

The isotope of hydrogen that has one neutron.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/557-Deuterium

Deuterium

‘Heavy Hydrogen`, an isotope having one proton and one neutron in the nucleus. It occurs in nature as 1 atom to 6,500 atoms of normal hydrogen (hydrogen atoms contain one proton and no neutrons). Deuterium oxide, or Heavy Water, can be used as a moderator in reactors.
Found on http://www.theiet.org/factfiles/energy/nuclear-terms.cfm?type=pdf

Deuterium

Deuterium: A non-radioactive isotope of hydrogen that contains a neutron in its nucleus in addition to the one proton normally seen in hydrogen. A deuterium atom is twice as heavy as normal hydrogen.
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=26770

deuterium

<radiobiology> A heavy isotope of hydrogen whose nucleus contains both a neutron and a proton. ... (09 Oct 1997) ...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?deuterium

deuterium

heavy hydrogen noun an isotope of hydrogen which has one neutron (as opposed to zero neutrons in hydrogen)
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=deuterium

deuterium

(D) (doo-tēr´e-әm) the mass 2 isotope of hydrogen; it is available as a gas or heavy water and has been used as a tracer or indicator in metabolic studies.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

deuterium

isotope of hydrogen with atomic weight of approximately 2. Its nucleus, consisting of one proton and one neutron, has double the mass of the nucleus ... [13 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/37

Deuterium

Isotope of hydrogen, with a nucleus containing one proton and one neutron, and an atomic mass number of 2.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/d.html

Deuterium

'Heavy Hydrogen', an isotope having one proton and one neutron in the nucleus. It occurs in nature as 1 atom to 6,500 atoms of normal hydrogen, (Hydrogen atoms contain one proton and no neutrons).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21076

deuterium

A heavy isotope of hydrogen in which the nucleus contains one proton and one neutron (compared with ordinary hydrogen`s single proton). Deuterium was discovered and named (from the Greek deuteros meaning 'second') by Harold Urey in 1933. In chemical equations it is denoted by the letter 'D'...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/D/deuterium.html

deuterium

deuterium (dOOtēr'ēum) , isotope of hydrogen with mass no. 2. The deuterium nucleus, called a deuteron, contains one proton and one neutron. Deuterium is also called heavy hydrogen, and water in which the hydrogen atoms are deuterium is called heavy water (deuterium oxide, D2O). Deut...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0815319.html

Deuterium

In chemistry, deuterium is an isotope of hydrogen having twice the mass of ordinary hydrogen.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/GD.HTM

deuterium

(D) Type: Term Pronunciation: dū-tē′rē-ŭm Synonyms: hydrogen-2
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=24155

deuterium

Naturally occurring heavy isotope of hydrogen, mass number 2 (one proton and one neutron), discovered by US chemist Harold Urey in 1932. It is sometimes given the symbol D. In nature, about one in every 6,500 hydrogen atoms is deuterium. Combined with oxygen, it produces `heavy water` (D2O), used in the nuclear indu...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0009971.html

Deuterium

An isotope of hydrogen whose atoms are twice as massive as ordinary hydrogen;deuterion atoms contain both a proton and a neutron in the nucleus.
Found on http://www.chemistry-dictionary.com/definition/deuterium.php

Deuterium

Deuterium/protium ratios thus continue to be an active topic of research in both astronomy and climatology. ==Differences between deuterium and common hydrogen (protium)== ===Chemical symbol=== Deuterium is frequently represented by the chemical symbol D. Since it is an isotope of hydrogen with mass number 2, it is also represented by {SimpleNucli...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deuterium

Deuterium

a non-radioactive isotope of the hydrogen atom that contains a neutron in its nucleus in addition to the one proton normally seen in hydrogen. A deuterium atom is twice as heavy as normal hydrogen. See also tritium.
Found on http://www.bt.cdc.gov/radiation/glossary.asp

Deuterium

(D, 2H) An isotope of hydrogen that contains one neutron and one proton in its nucleus.
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Science/Chemistry/
No exact match found