Danegeld

a land tax levied on the CARUCATE, HIDE or SULONG, originally to buy off Danish attacks on late Anglo-Saxon England; in Norman times a normal peace-time tax raised almost every year.
Found on http://www.msgb.co.uk/glossary.html

danegeld

In English history, a tax imposed from 991 onwards by Anglo-Saxon kings to pay tribute to the Vikings. After the Norman Conquest (1066), the tax was revived and was levied until 1162; the Normans...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Danegeld

• (n.) Alt. of Danegelt
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/danegeld/

Danegeld

a tax levied in Anglo-Saxon England to buy off Danish invaders in the reign of Ethelred II (978–1016); it also designates the recurrent gelds, or ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/6

Danegeld

The Danegeld (d; "Danish tax", literally "Dane debt") was a tax raised to pay tribute to the Viking raiders to save a land from being ravaged. It was called the geld or gafol in eleventh-century sources; the term Danegeld did not appear until the early twelfth century. It was characteristic of royal policy in both England and Francia during th...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danegeld

Danegeld

Danegeld (dān'geld") , medieval land tax originally raised to buy off raiding Danes and later used for military expenditures. In England the tribute was first levied in 868, then in 871 by Alfred, and occasionally thereafter. Under Æthelred (965?–1016) it became a regular ta...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/history/A0814610.html

danegeld

In English history, a tax imposed from 991 onwards by Anglo-Saxon kings to pay tribute to the Vikings. After the Norman Conquest (1066), the tax was revived and was levied until 1162; the Normans used it to finance military operations. Danegeld was first exacted in the reign of Ethelred (II) the Unready (978–1016). This payment was dis...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0022415.html

Danegeld

The practice of paying extortion money to Vikings to make them go away, often associated in particul
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385
No exact match found