Damping

The use of high mass/low stiffness materials applied to panels, screens, ducts, etc to reduce vibration in regions of resonance or coincidence.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20474

Damping

Damping refers to the ability of an audio component to stop after the signal ends. For example, if a drum is struck with a mallet, the sound will reach a peak level and then decay in a certain amount of time to no sound. An audio component that allows the decay to drag on too long has poor damping and less definition than one wants. An audio co...
Found on http://www.musiconmypc.co.uk/art_glossary.php

Damping

Damping refers to the ability of an audio component to stop after the signal ends. For example, if a drum is struck with a mallet, the sound will reach a peak level and then decay in a certain amount of time to no sound. An audio component that allows the decay to drag on too long has poor damping and less definition than one wants. An audio compon...
Found on http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/music%20tech%20glossary/Music%20Tech%20Gl

Damping

Dissipation of energy in a system, either through time or distance.Constrained-layer damperA treatment to control the vibration of a structure by bonding a layer of damping material between the structure`s surface and an additional elastic layer (that is, the constraining layer), whose relative stiffness is greater than that of the damping material...
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/d/a/damping/source.html

Damping

The reduction of response at the resonant frequency through the use of a damping media such as oil. Usually specified as the ratio of critical damping.
Found on http://www.flowmeterdirectory.com/flowmeter_technical_glossary/flowmeter_te

Damping

Diminishing the intensity of vibrations.
Found on http://www.komprex.com/Glossary/index.htm

damping

Bringing a mechanism to rest with minimal oscillation; e.g., in echocardiography, electrical or mechanical loading to reduce duration of echo, transmitter pulse, and transmitter complex. ... Origin: M.E. Damp, poisonous vapor ... (05 Mar 2000) ...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?damping

damping

(dampĀ“ing) steady diminution of the amplitude of successive vibrations of a specific form of energy, as of electricity.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Damping

• (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Damp
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/damping/

damping

in physics, restraining of vibratory motion, such as mechanical oscillations, noise, and alternating electric currents, by dissipation of energy. ... [3 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/5

Damping

[music] Damping is a technique in music for altering the sound of a musical instrument. Damping methods are used for a number of instruments. ==Guitar== On guitar, damping (also referred to as choking) is a technique where, shortly after playing the strings, the sound is reduced by pressing the right hand palm against the strings, right han...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damping_(music)

Damping

Of or pertaining to the control of vibration by electrical or mechanical means.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21058

Damping

For floor vibrations, it is the rate of decay of amplitude.
Found on http://www.areforum.org/up/GeneralStructures/JOIST%20AND%20STRUCTURAL%20GLO

Damping

The physical touching of a component to arrest vibration.
Found on http://www.mcnallyinstitute.com/Charts/Glossary-html/Glossary_D.html

Damping

refers to the rate of decay or settling time of a signal.
Found on http://www.empiremagnetics.com/glossary/glossary.htm#A

damping

property of dynamic processes to subside NOTE - Cause of damping is dissipation, for example friction, resistors, or active by means of control.
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=351-24-17

damping

dissipation of energy of an oscillating system with time or distance
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=801-24-19

damping

Type: Term Pronunciation: damp′ing Definitions: 1. Bringing a mechanism to rest with minimal oscillation; in echocardiography, electrical or mechanical loading to reduce duration of echo, transmitter pulse, and transmitter complex.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=22846

Damping

Loss of energy in wave motion due to transfer into heat by frictional forces.
Found on http://earthquakescanada.nrcan.gc.ca/info-gen/glossa-eng.php

damping

restraining the pitch, loudness, and/or duration of a drum beat.
Found on http://www.carnaval.com/bahia/glossary/

Damping

Damping is an influence within or upon an oscillatory system that has the effect of reducing, restricting or preventing its oscillations. In physical systems, damping is produced by processes that dissipate the energy stored in the oscillation. Examples include viscous drag in mechanical systems, resistance in electronic oscillators, and absorptio...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damping

Damping

A ski's resistance to sustained vibration, usually built into the ski with layers of shock-absorbing material.
Found on http://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/skiing-glossary.html

Damping

As Newton observed, an object once set in ,motion will keep on moving unless a restrictive counterfo
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Technology/Home_Audio/

Damping

reducing excess vibrations in the rod blank when unloading the rod during a cast. This causes fewer waves in your fly line resulting in more power and distance for less effort.
Found on http://howtoflyfish.orvis.com/glossary/beginners-fly-fishing-glossary

Damping

reducing excess vibrations in the rod blank when unloading the rod during a cast. This causes fewer waves in your fly line resulting in more power & distance for less effort. Orvis use a proprietary damping material, called MVR, in the handle of the Trident Rods to accomplish this to a level not attainable by casting skills alone.
Found on http://www.orvis.co.uk/intro.aspx?subject=165
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