Damascening

A method of decorating the bottom plate or bridges, consisting of a radial or striped design which appears to shimmer as it catches the light at different angles;  especially associated with American watches from the 1870s onwards.   It is actually a variety of engine-turning and unrelated to the da
Found on http://www.timtemplewatches.com/information_watch_dictionary1.html

damascening

Process of setting fine pieces of contrasting metals into a metal body, such as the blade of a sword or a casket, for decoration. The technique was originally developed in Damascus in the Near East and was adopted in Europe in the 17thC. Gold, silver or copper wires were inserted into fine grooves cut into an iron, brass or bronze body and then ham
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

damascening

art of encrusting gold, silver, or copper wire on the surface of iron, steel, bronze, or brass. A narrow undercut is made in the surface of the ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/5

Damascening

Damascening is the art of inlaying different metals into one another—typically, gold or silver into a darkly oxidized steel background—to produce intricate patterns similar to niello. The English term comes from a perceived resemblance to the rich tapestry patterns of damask silk. The technique has a long history in Japan, where it was used to
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damascening

damascening

damascening (dămusēn'ing) or damaskeening (–skēn'–) , the art of decorating iron, steel, or bronze with inlaid threads of gold or silver, or producing a watered effect in forging, as in sword blades, gun barrels, and various metal objects. The method, long pract...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0814561.html

damascening

The process of setting contrasting pieces of fine metals into a metal body such as the blade of a sword or a casket for the purposes of decoration. Originally developed in damascus and was adopted in europe during the 17thC. Gold, silver or copper wires are inserted into fine grooves cut into an iron, brass or bronze body and then hammered into the
Found on http://www.antique-marks.com/antique-terms-d.html

damascening

The inlaying of a soft metal like silver or copper into a hard metal like steel. The name comes from the city of Damascus, where this process was first used.
Found on http://www.inlandlapidary.com/user_area/lapidary_terms.asp
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