Contraction

[operator theory] using the above identification. for n > 0. The above construction then yields a minimal unitary dilation. The same method can be applied to prove a second dilation theorem of Sz._Nagy for a one-parameter strongly continuous contraction semigroup T(t) (t ≥ 0) on a Hilbert space H. {harvtxt|Cooper|1947} had previously prov
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contraction_(operator_theory)

contraction

[n] - a word formed from two or more words by omitting or combining some sounds 2. [n] - (physiology) a shortening or tensing of a part or organ (especially of a muscle or muscle fiber)
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=contraction

contraction

The tightening of a muscle. In labour, the strong, rhythmic contractions of the muscles of the uterus open up the cervix and push the baby out. Any contractions before labour begins are usually irregular and don't increase in intensity or duration.
Found on http://www.babycentre.co.uk/glossary/b/

Contraction

[pronounce: con-track-shun] When something is getting smaller.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20442

Contraction

see apostrophe
Found on http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/primary/publications/literacy/63285/nls_fw

Contraction

Contraction: The tightening and shortening of a muscle.
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=2834

Contraction

Con·trac'tion noun [ Latin contractio : confer French contraction .] 1. The act or process of contracting, shortening, or shrinking; the state of being contracted; as, contraction of the heart, of the pupil of the eye, or of a tendon; the contraction produced by col
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/149

contraction

<physiology> A shortening or reduction in size, in connection with muscles contraction implies shortening and/or development of tension. ... Origin: L. Contractus = drawn together ... (18 Nov 1997) ...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?contraction

contraction

noun the act of decreasing (something) in size or volume or quantity or scope
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=contraction

contraction

noun a word formed from two or more words by omitting or combining some sounds; ``won`t` is a contraction of `will not``; ``o`clock` is a contraction of `of the clock``
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=contraction

contraction

muscle contraction noun (physiology) a shortening or tensing of a part or organ (especially of a muscle or muscle fiber)
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=contraction

contraction

(kәn-trak´shәn) a drawing together; a shortening or shrinkage.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Contraction

• (n.) The act or process of contracting, shortening, or shrinking; the state of being contracted; as, contraction of the heart, of the pupil of the eye, or of a tendion; the contraction produced by cold. • (n.) A marriage contract. • (n.) Something contracted or abbreviated, as a word or phrase; -- as, plenipo for plenipotentiary; c
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/contraction/

contraction

(from the article `paleography`) ...problem confronting paleographers. They were extensively used in Roman times by lawyers to avoid repetition of technical terms and formulas. ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/135

contraction

(from the article `economic stabilizer`) When business begins to contract, the first manifestation is a decrease in investment that causes unemployment in the capital goods industries; the ... ...of administrative, clerical, and technical workers relative to manual workers. A second course of change has affected occupations linked with ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/135

contraction

(L. contractus drawn together) a shortening or reduction in size; in connection with muscles contraction implies shortening and/or development of tension.
Found on http://users.ugent.be/~rvdstich/eugloss/DIC/dictio20.html

Contraction

Economic contraction
Found on http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alandear/glossary/c.html

Contraction

[grammar] A contraction is a shortened version of the written and spoken forms of a word, syllable, or word group, created by omission of internal letters. In traditional grammar, contraction can denote the formation of a new word from one word or a group of words, for example, by elision. This often occurs in rendering a common sequence of
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contraction_(grammar)

contraction

A period of general economic decline. Contractions are often part of a business cycle, coming after an expansionary phase and before a recession....
Found on http://www.oenb.at/dictionary/termini.jsp?EINTRAG_ID=16179

Contraction

A forceful, rhythmic and often painful tightening of the uterine muscles during labor. Contractions occur during childbirth and help to push the baby through the cervix and out of the vagina. True labor contractions will become closer, stronger and will help dilate the cervix. False labor contractions do not become closer or stronger and are know..
Found on http://www.pregnology.com/AZ/C/9

contraction

contraction, in writing: see abbreviation.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0912122.html

contraction

contraction, in physics: see expansion.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0912120.html

contraction

(C) Type: Term Pronunciation: kon-trak′shŭn Definitions: 1. A shortening or increase in tension; denoting the normal function of muscle. 2. Shrinkage or reduction in size. 3. Heart beat, as in premature contraction.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=20093

Contraction

[economics] A contraction is a period of economic decline marked by falling real GDP. See Recession. During the 1870s and 1880s, the recalling of paperbacks, due to pressure by "hardmoney" Republicans caused a contraction reducing the amount of money per capita by 5 cents. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contraction_(economics)

Contraction

The volume change occurring in metals (except antimony and bismuth) and alloys on solidification and cooling to room temperature.
Found on http://www.metaltek.com/value-engineering/glossary.html
No exact match found