Bay

[surname] Bay is a surname used in many countries around the world. The name has many variations and meanings. The name is also found in Denmark, Sweden and Norway, where it may be a short form of German Bayer, regional name for someone from Bavaria, or from baygh, originally a loan word from French denoting a type of fabric. There are curr...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bay_(surname)

Bay

Internal division of building marked by roof principals or vaulting piers.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20018

bay

A unit of interior space in a building, marked off by architectural divisions.
Found on http://www.pitt.edu/~medart/menuglossary/INDEX.HTM

Bay

a vertical division, usually marked by vertical shafts or supporting columns.
Found on http://www.britainexpress.com/History/medieval/church-glossary.htm

bay

The bottom shelf in a retail aisle.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20108

Bay

A recess or INLET in the shore of a sea or lake between two capes or headlands, not as large as a GULF but larger than a COVE. See also BIGHT, EMBAYMENT. See Figure 5.
Found on http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/sea/swces/products/glossary.htm

bay

[adj] - (used of animals especially a horse) of a moderate reddish-brown color 2. [n] - an indentation of a shoreline larger than a cove but smaller than a gulf 3. [n] - the sound of a hound on the scent 4. [n] - a compartment on a ship between decks 5. [n] - a compartment in an aircraft used for some specific purpose 6. [n]
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=bay

Bay

Section of a building between columns or buttresses.
Found on http://www.digital-documents.co.uk/archi/gloschur.htm

bay

a section of an elevation as divided by columns, windows, etc.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20559

Bay

A subdivision of the interior space of a building. In Romanesque and Gothic churches, the transverse arches and piers of the arcade divide the building into bays.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/b/a/bay/source.html

Bay

Buildings are often divided into vertical sections by regularly spaced vertical sections, such as arches, columns or windows. Each section is known as a bay.
Found on http://www.keystothepast.info/durhamcc/k2p.nsf/k2pGlossaryList?readform&let

Bay

The lateral space between the interplane struts on one side of a biplane. Thus a Gauntlet is a two-bay biplane, a Gladiator is a single-bay biplane.
Found on http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/glossary/

Bay

A compartment in the layout of a church, marked by shafts, main arcade and often by vaulting over each single compartment. A double bay is a pair of adjacent bays in a church with piers of alternating forms. (hg note: separate entry created for double bay)
Found on http://www.crsbi.ac.uk/resources/glossary.html

Bay

This is a subdivision, or unit, or compartment of interior space, within a building. It is visually, and sometimes structurally, marked off from the adjoining space by architectural divisions.
Found on http://www.virtualani.org/glossary/index.htm

Bay

a division of a church or roof, usually marked by arcade arches or roof trusses.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20941

Bay

Bay adjective [ French bai , from Latin badius brown, chestnut-colored; -- used only of horses.] Reddish brown; of the color of a chestnut; -- applied to the color of horses. Bay cat (Zoology) , a wild cat of Africa and the East Indies ( Felis aurata ). -- ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/24

Bay

Bay noun [ French baie , from Late Latin baia . Of uncertain origin: confer Ir. & Gael. badh or bagh bay, harbor, creek; Bisc. baia , baiya , harbor, and French bayer to gape, open the mouth.] 1. (Geology) An inlet of the sea, usually s...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/24

Bay

Bay noun [ French baie a berry, the fruit of the laurel and other trees, from Latin baca , bacca , a small round fruit, a berry, akin to Lithuanian bapka laurel berry.] 1. A berry, particularly of the laurel. [ Obsolete] 2. The laurel tree ( Laurus nobili...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/24

Bay

Bay intransitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Bayed (bād); present participle & verbal noun Baying .] [ Middle English bayen , abayen , Old French abaier , French aboyer , to bark; of uncertain o...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/24

Bay

Bay transitive verb To bark at; hence, to follow with barking; to bring or drive to bay; as, to bay the bear. Shak.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/24

Bay

Bay noun [ See Bay , intransitive verb ] 1. Deep-toned, prolonged barking. 'The bay of curs.' Cowper. 2. [ Middle English bay , abay , Old French abai , French aboi barking, plural abois , prop. the e...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/24

Bay

Bay transitive verb [ Confer Middle English bæwen to bathe, and German bähen to foment.] To bathe. [ Obsolete] Spenser.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/24

Bay

Bay noun A bank or dam to keep back water.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/24

Bay

Bay transitive verb To dam, as water; -- with up or back .
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/24

bay

A part of a sea or lake indenting the shore line, the word is often applied to very large tracts of water around which the land forms a curve, as Hudson's Bay. ... (09 Oct 1997) ...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?bay
No exact match found